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Autobiographical memory stability in the context of the Adult Attachment Interview.

Authors
  • Köber, Christin1
  • Facompré, Christopher R2
  • Waters, Theodore E A3
  • Simpson, Jeffry A4
  • 1 New York University - Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates. Electronic address: [email protected] , (United Arab Emirates)
  • 2 State University of New York at Stony Brook University, United States. , (United States)
  • 3 New York University - Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates. , (United Arab Emirates)
  • 4 University of Minnesota, United States. , (United States)
Type
Published Article
Journal
Cognition
Publication Date
Oct 01, 2019
Volume
191
Pages
103980–103980
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1016/j.cognition.2019.05.017
PMID: 31238247
Source
Medline
Keywords
Language
English
License
Unknown

Abstract

Increasing evidence suggests that both attachment representations and autobiographical memories are moderately stable over time. Evidence examining the stability of attachment-related memories is scarce, although these memories of early caregiving are thought to underpin attachment representations. Connecting research on stability of autobiographical memories with research on attachment representation, the present study investigated the stability of attachment-related autobiographical memories, which were provided by 151 emerging adults in repeated Adult Attachment Interviews conducted seven years apart. Results show that these childhood memories are as stable as other memories from later periods of life, and that memory stability depends on retrieval mode, memory valence, autobiographical memory specificity, and memory content (i.e., maternal vs. paternal caregiver). Investigating the relation of stability of attachment-related memory content with attachment security revealed mainly an association with secure base script knowledge, supporting the notion that attachment representations are firmly rooted in semantic and autobiographical memory systems. Copyright © 2019 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

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