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Focused Ultrasound Treatment of a Spheroid In Vitro Tumour Model.

Authors
  • Landgraf, Lisa1
  • Kozlowski, Adam1, 2
  • Zhang, Xinrui1
  • Fournelle, Marc3
  • Becker, Franz-Josef3
  • Tretbar, Steffen3
  • Melzer, Andreas1
  • 1 Innovation Center Computer Assisted Surgery, Institute at the Faculty of Medicine, Leipzig University, 04103 Leipzig, Germany. , (Germany)
  • 2 Department of Anatomy, School of Medicine, Collegium Medicum, University of Warmia and Mazury, 10-082 Olsztyn, Poland. , (Poland)
  • 3 Fraunhofer Institute for Biomedical Engineering (IBMT), 66280 Sulzbach, Germany. , (Germany)
Type
Published Article
Journal
Cells
Publisher
MDPI AG
Publication Date
Apr 30, 2022
Volume
11
Issue
9
Identifiers
DOI: 10.3390/cells11091518
PMID: 35563823
Source
Medline
Keywords
Language
English
License
Unknown

Abstract

Focused ultrasound (FUS) is a non-invasive technique producing a variety of biological effects by either thermal or mechanical mechanisms of ultrasound interaction with the targeted tissue. FUS could bring benefits, e.g., tumour sensitisation, immune stimulation, and targeted drug delivery, but investigation of FUS effects at the cellular level is still missing. New techniques are commonly tested in vitro on two-dimensional (2D) monolayer cancer cell culture models. The 3D tumour model-spheroid-is mainly utilised to mimic solid tumours from an architectural standpoint. It is a promising method to simulate the characteristics of tumours in vitro and their various responses to therapeutic alternatives. This study aimed to evaluate the effects of FUS on human prostate and glioblastoma cancer tumour spheroids in vitro. The experimental follow-up enclosed the measurements of spheroid integrity and growth kinetics, DNA damage, and cellular metabolic activity by measuring intracellular ATP content in the spheroids. Our results showed that pulsed FUS treatment induced molecular effects in 3D tumour models. With the disruption of the spheroid integrity, we observed an increase in DNA double-strand breaks, leading to damage in the cancer cells depending on the cancer cell type.

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