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Auditory and visual naming tests for children.

Authors
  • Hamberger, Marla J1
  • Seidel, William T2
  • MacAllister, William S3
  • Smith, Mary Lou4
  • 1 a Department of Neurology , Columbia University , New York , NY , USA.
  • 2 b Department of Medical Affairs , Ironshore Pharmaceuticals Inc , Chesterbrook , PA , USA.
  • 3 c Department of Neurology , New York University , New York , NY , USA.
  • 4 d Department of Psychology , University of Toronto , Mississauga , Canada. , (Canada)
Type
Published Article
Journal
Child Neuropsychology
Publisher
Informa UK (Taylor & Francis)
Publication Date
Oct 01, 2018
Volume
24
Issue
7
Pages
903–922
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1080/09297049.2017.1414172
PMID: 29258379
Source
Medline
Keywords
Language
English
License
Unknown

Abstract

Assessment of naming in children has been hampered by the use of tests that were developed, either to assess naming in adults or to assess related verbal functions in children. We developed comparable visual naming test (VNT) and auditory description naming (ANT) specifically for children. We collected normative data, not only for accuracy, typically the sole performance measure, but also for response time (RT) and reliance on phonemic cuing. The normative sample consisted of 200 typically developing children, ages 6-15, with 40 children per 2-year age group (6-7, 8-9, 10-11, 12-13, and 14-15). Children were tested individually by a trained examiner. Based on item analysis, naming tests were finalized at 36 items for ages 8-15 and 28 items for ages 6-7. Age-stratified normative data are provided for accuracy, mean RT, tip-of-the-tongues (i.e., delayed but accurate responses plus items named following phonemic cueing), and a summary score, which incorporates all performance measures. Internal and test-retest reliability coefficients for both tests were reasonable. Accuracy scores were high across age groups, indicating that item names were within the mental lexicon of most typically developing children. By contrast, time and cue-based scores improved with age, reflecting greater efficiency in word retrieval with development. These complementary auditory naming and visual naming tests for children address a longstanding clinical need, improving upon the current standard with respect to the sensitivity of performance measures and the addition of an auditory verbal component to the assessment of naming in children.

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