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Atypical B cells consist of subsets with distinct functional profiles.

Authors
  • Reyes, Raphael A1
  • Batugedara, Gayani1
  • Dutta, Paramita2
  • Reers, Ashley B1
  • Garza, Rolando1
  • Ssewanyana, Isaac3, 4
  • Jagannathan, Prasanna5, 6
  • Feeney, Margaret E7, 8
  • Greenhouse, Bryan7
  • Bol, Sebastiaan1
  • Ay, Ferhat2, 9
  • Bunnik, Evelien M1
  • 1 Department of Microbiology, Immunology and Molecular Genetics, Long School of Medicine, The University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, San Antonio, TX 78229, USA.
  • 2 Centers for Cancer Immunotherapy and Autoimmunity, La Jolla Institute for Immunology, La Jolla, CA 92037, USA.
  • 3 Infectious Disease Research Collaboration, Kampala, Uganda. , (Uganda)
  • 4 Department of Infection Biology, London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, London WC1E 7HT, UK.
  • 5 Department of Medicine, Division of Infectious Diseases, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305, USA.
  • 6 Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305, USA.
  • 7 Department of Medicine, University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, CA 94110, USA.
  • 8 Department of Pediatrics, University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, CA 94110, USA.
  • 9 Department of Pediatrics, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, CA 92093, USA.
Type
Published Article
Journal
iScience
Publisher
Elsevier
Publication Date
Dec 15, 2023
Volume
26
Issue
12
Pages
108496–108496
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1016/j.isci.2023.108496
PMID: 38098745
Source
Medline
Keywords
Language
English
License
Unknown

Abstract

Atypical B cells are a population of activated B cells that are commonly enriched in individuals with chronic immune activation but are also part of a normal immune response to infection or vaccination. To better define the role of atypical B cells in the human adaptive immune response, we performed single-cell sequencing of transcriptomes, cell surface markers, and B cell receptors in individuals with chronic exposure to the malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum, a condition known to lead to accumulation of circulating atypical B cells. We identified three previously uncharacterized populations of atypical B cells with distinct transcriptional and functional profiles and observed marked differences among these three subsets in their ability to produce immunoglobulin G upon T-cell-dependent activation. Our findings help explain the conflicting observations in prior studies regarding the function of atypical B cells and highlight their different roles in the adaptive immune response in chronic inflammatory conditions. © 2023 The Author(s).

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