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Attitudes about aggression and perpetration of Adolescent Dating Aggression: A cross-lagged panel model.

Authors
  • Sabol, Brianna M1
  • Kernsmith, Poco D2
  • Hicks, Megan R3
  • Smith-Darden, Joanne P4
  • 1 Wayne State University, School of Social Work, 5447 Woodward Avenue, Detroit, MI, 48202, USA. Electronic address: [email protected]
  • 2 Wayne State University, School of Social Work, 5447 Woodward Avenue, Detroit, MI, 48202, USA. Electronic address: [email protected]
  • 3 Wayne State University, School of Social Work, 5447 Woodward Avenue, Detroit, MI, 48202, USA. Electronic address: g[email protected]
  • 4 Michigan State University, School of Social Work, 655 Auditorium Road, East Lansing, MI, 48824, USA. Electronic address: [email protected]
Type
Published Article
Journal
Journal of Adolescence
Publisher
Elsevier
Publication Date
Aug 05, 2020
Volume
83
Pages
100–111
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1016/j.adolescence.2020.07.005
PMID: 32768739
Source
Medline
Keywords
Language
English
License
Unknown

Abstract

Several cross-sectional and longitudinal studies have found associations between attitudes about aggression and aggressive behaviors. However, few studies examine all subtypes of Adolescent Dating Aggression (ADA)-physical, psychological/emotional, sexual, and stalking; occurring in person or electronically-and there is a paucity of longitudinal studies that follow adolescents over several years. Middle school and high school students (N = 1240), in the Midwestern United States, participated in surveys one time per year for four years. Data from each year (Y1, Y2, Y3, & Y4) was used to conduct a cross-lagged panel analysis of attitudes about aggression and aggressive behaviors, among both cohorts. By Y4, approximately 46% of the middle school cohort and 60% of the high school cohort perpetrated some form of ADA. The cross-lagged panel analysis revealed significant cross-sectional associations in the middle school (Y1, Y2, & Y4) and high school (Y1 & Y2) cohorts. Aggressive behaviors were significantly associated with future aggressive behaviors for the middle and high school cohorts each year. Similarly, attitudes about aggression were significantly associated with attitudes in the following years for both cohorts. Among the middle school cohort, there were significant cross-lagged effects between aggressive behaviors in Y2 and attitudes about aggression in Y3, as well as aggressive behaviors in Y3 and attitudes about aggression in Y4. Among the high school cohort, a bidirectional association was found from Y2 to Y3. These findings suggest prevention programs should be implemented earlier, among middle school aged adolescents, and target factors beyond attitudes supporting aggression. Copyright © 2020 The Foundation for Professionals in Services for Adolescents. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

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