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Asymptomatic spontaneous complete uterine rupture in a term pregnancy after uterine packing during previous caesarean section: a case report.

Authors
  • Zhang, J
  • Chen, S F
  • Luo, Y E
Type
Published Article
Journal
Clinical and experimental obstetrics & gynecology
Publication Date
Jan 01, 2014
Volume
41
Issue
5
Pages
597–598
Identifiers
PMID: 25864270
Source
Medline
License
Unknown

Abstract

Uterine rupture is a life-threatening obstetrical complication with significant neonatal and maternal morbidity. The authors report a 36-year-old woman with a history of previous caesarean section because of pre-eclampsia and antepartum haemorrhage at 31 gestational weeks during her first pregnancy. Postpartum haemorrhage occurred and the uterine cavity was packed with gauze for reducing blood loss. After two years, she underwent elective, repeat caesarean section at 38+1 gestational weeks with no abdominal pain or vaginal bleeding. During the operation, a six- to seven-cm-long defect was found in the lower uterine segment, with complete separation of the uterine scar and disruption of the visceral peritoneum. A live baby was delivered. The postoperative course was uneventful. Uterine dehiscence and rupture should be suspected in the presence of risk factors such as previous caesarean section, especially uterine packing involved. Spontaneous silent rupture can occur in women without any alarming symptoms.

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