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Asymmetric division: motor persistence pays off.

Authors
  • 1
  • 1 Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of Minnesota, 7-132 Hasselmo Hall, 312 Church Street S.E., Minneapolis, Minnesota 55455, USA.
Type
Published Article
Journal
Current Biology
0960-9822
Publisher
Elsevier
Publication Date
Volume
16
Issue
24
Identifiers
PMID: 17174905
Source
Medline
License
Unknown

Abstract

A new study shows that an antagonistic force model can explain a number of complex mitotic spindle movements in the first mitosis of the Caenorhabditis elegans embryo by simply assuming that cortical force generators become increasingly persistent in their interaction with microtubules during mitosis.

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