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Associations of Plasma Fatty Acid Patterns during Pregnancy with Respiratory and Allergy Outcomes at School Age

Authors
  • Mensink-Bout, Sara M.1,
  • Voortman, Trudy
  • Dervishaj, Marsela1,
  • Reiss, Irwin K. M.
  • De Jongste, Johan C.
  • Jaddoe, Vincent W. V.1, 2
  • Duijts, Liesbeth
  • 1 (V.W.V.J.)
  • 2 Department of Pediatrics, Erasmus MC, University Medical Center, 3000 CA Rotterdam, The Netherlands
Type
Published Article
Journal
Nutrients
Publisher
MDPI AG
Publication Date
Oct 07, 2020
Volume
12
Issue
10
Identifiers
DOI: 10.3390/nu12103057
PMID: 33036333
PMCID: PMC7601105
Source
PubMed Central
Keywords
License
Green

Abstract

Fatty acids might play a role in asthma and allergy development as they can modulate immune responses. We examined among 4260 mother-child pairs participating in a population-based cohort the associations of maternal plasma fatty acid patterns during pregnancy with a child’s respiratory and allergy outcomes at school-age. In mid-pregnancy, 22 individual fatty acids were measured from maternal blood. Three patterns were previously identified by principal component analysis: A ‘high n-6 polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA)’, a ‘monounsaturated and saturated fatty acid’, and a ‘high n-3 PUFA’ pattern. At the age of 10 years, a child’s lung function was assessed by spirometry, current asthma and physician-diagnosed inhalant allergy by questionnaire, and inhalant allergic sensitization by skin prick tests. A higher ‘high n-6 PUFA’ pattern was associated with a higher forced expiratory volume in 1 s/forced vital capacity and forced expiratory flow after exhaling 75% of forced vital capacity (Z-score difference (95% CI) 0.04 (0, 0.07) and 0.04 (0.01, 0.07), respectively, per SD increase in the fatty acid pattern). We observed no associations of maternal fatty acid patterns with a child’s asthma or allergy outcomes. Our results showed limited associations of maternal patterns of high n-6 PUFA concentrations in pregnancy with a better lung function in school-aged children.

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