Affordable Access

deepdyve-link
Publisher Website

Associations of HLA class I antigen specificities and haplotypes with disease progression in HIV-1-infected Hans in Northern China.

Authors
  • Zhang, Hui1
  • Zhao, Bin
  • Han, Xiaoxu
  • Wang, Zhe
  • Liu, Baogui
  • Lu, Chunming
  • Zhang, Min
  • Liu, Jing
  • Chen, Ou
  • Hu, Qinghai
  • Jiang, Fanming
  • Shang, Hong
  • 1 Key Laboratory of AIDS Immunology of the Ministry of Health, Department of Laboratory Medicine, The First Hospital of China Medical University, Shenyang, China. , (China)
Type
Published Article
Journal
Human immunology
Publication Date
Dec 01, 2013
Volume
74
Issue
12
Pages
1636–1642
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1016/j.humimm.2013.08.287
PMID: 24012585
Source
Medline
Keywords
Language
English
License
Unknown

Abstract

The human leukocyte antigen (HLA) allele frequencies, which differ among various ethnic populations, may result in population-specific effects on HIV-1 disease progression. No large-scale study has yet been conducted on the Chinese population. In this study, HLA class I antigen specificities were determined in a cohort including 105 long-term non-progressors (LTNPs) and 321 typical progressors (TPs), who were recruited from HIV-1-infected Northern Han Chinese, to determine the associations between certain HLA types and HIV-1 disease progression. The frequencies of HLA class I specificities and haplotypes among the two groups were compared using binary logistic stepwise regression. Results showed that HLA-A(∗)30-B(∗)13-C(∗)06 (OR = 0.387, P = 0.019) and B(∗)67 (OR = 0.134, P = 0.005) were associated with a long-term non-progressing condition, and C(∗)01 (OR = 2.539, P = 0.050) was overrepresented in TPs after adjusting for non-genetic factors (sex, age, the location of patients, HIV subtype and the route of infection). The influence of HLA homozygosity on HIV disease progression was also analyzed. However, homozygosity at HLA-A, HLA-B or HLA-C conferred no observable disadvantage in our study population (P = 0.730, 0.246 and 0.445, respectively). These findings suggest that the host's genetics make important contributions to HIV viral control and may help to develop peptide-based vaccines for this population. Copyright © 2013 American Society for Histocompatibility and Immunogenetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

Report this publication

Statistics

Seen <100 times