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Associations Between Perceived Weight Status, Body Dissatisfaction, and Self-Objectification on Sexual Sensation Seeking and Sexual Risk Behaviors Among Men Who Have Sex with Men Using Grindr.

Authors
  • Goedel, William C1
  • Krebs, Paul2
  • Greene, Richard E3
  • Duncan, Dustin T4
  • 1 a Department of Population Health, School of Medicine; College of Global Public Health; and Department of Sociology, College of Arts and Science , New York University.
  • 2 b Department of Population Health, School of Medicine , New York University; VA New York Harbor Healthcare System.
  • 3 c Department of Medicine, School of Medicine; Center for Health, Identity, Behavior, and Prevention Studies, Steinhardt School of Culture, Education, and Human Development , New York University.
  • 4 d Department of Population Health, School of Medicine; College of Global Public Health; Center for Health, Identity, Behavior, and Prevention Studies, Steinhardt School of Culture, Education, and Human Development; Center for Drug Use and HIV Research, College of Nursing; Population Center, College of Arts and Science; and Center for Data Science , New York University.
Type
Published Article
Journal
Behavioral medicine (Washington, D.C.)
Publication Date
Jan 01, 2017
Volume
43
Issue
2
Pages
142–150
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1080/08964289.2015.1121130
PMID: 26808206
Source
Medline
Keywords
License
Unknown

Abstract

To date, various dimensions of body image and their associations with condom use have not been studied among men who have sex with men (MSM) who use geosocial-networking smartphone applications ("apps") to meet new sexual partners. The purpose of the current study was to evaluate associations between weight perception, body dissatisfaction, and self-objectification with sexual behaviors among a sample of MSM (N = 92) recruited from Grindr, an app popular among MSM, to complete an online survey. Obese participants scored significantly higher on measures of body dissatisfaction and lower on measures of sexual sensation seeking. Decreased propensities to seek sexual sensations were associated with fewer sexual partners. By assessing associations between dimensions of body dissatisfaction and sexual risk behaviors, this study adds support to a theory of syndemics among MSM, which suggests that synergistically related biological, psychological, social, and behavioral factors disproportionately affect health and health-related behaviors in this population.

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