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The associations of anthropometric, behavioural and sociodemographic factors with circulating concentrations of IGF-I, IGF-II, IGFBP-1, IGFBP-2 and IGFBP-3 in a pooled analysis of 16,024 men from 22 studies.

Authors
  • Watts, Eleanor L1
  • Perez-Cornago, Aurora1
  • Appleby, Paul N1
  • Albanes, Demetrius2
  • Ardanaz, Eva3
  • Black, Amanda2
  • Bueno-de-Mesquita, H Bas4, 5, 6, 7
  • Chan, June M8, 9
  • Chen, Chu10
  • Chubb, S A Paul11, 12
  • Cook, Michael B2
  • Deschasaux, Mélanie13
  • Donovan, Jenny L14
  • English, Dallas R15, 16
  • Flicker, Leon12, 17, 18
  • Freedman, Neal D2
  • Galan, Pilar13
  • Giles, Graham G15, 16
  • Giovannucci, Edward L19, 20, 21
  • Gunter, Marc J22
  • And 44 more
  • 1 Cancer Epidemiology Unit, Nuffield Department of Population Health, University of Oxford, Oxford, United Kingdom. , (United Kingdom)
  • 2 Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, Department of Health and Human Services, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD.
  • 3 Navarra Public Health Institute, Pamplona, Spain. , (Spain)
  • 4 Department for Determinants of Chronic Diseases, National Institute for Public Health and the Environment (RIVM), Bilthoven, The Netherlands. , (Netherlands)
  • 5 Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, University Medical Centre, Utrecht, The Netherlands. , (Netherlands)
  • 6 Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Imperial College London, London, United Kingdom. , (United Kingdom)
  • 7 Department of Social & Preventive Medicine, University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. , (Malaysia)
  • 8 Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, CA.
  • 9 Department Urology, University of California-San Francisco, San Francisco, CA.
  • 10 Public Health Sciences Division, Program in Epidemiology, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle, WA.
  • 11 PathWest Laboratory Medicine, Fiona Stanley Hospital, Perth, WA, Australia. , (Australia)
  • 12 Medical School, University of Western Australia, Perth, WA, Australia. , (Australia)
  • 13 Sorbonne Paris Cité Epidemiology and Statistics Research Center (CRESS), Nutritional Epidemiology Research Team (EREN), Inserm U1153/Inra U1125/Cnam/Paris 13 University, Paris, France. , (France)
  • 14 Department of Population Health Sciences, Bristol Medical School, University of Bristol, Bristol, United Kingdom. , (United Kingdom)
  • 15 Cancer Epidemiology and Intelligence Division, Cancer Council Victoria, Melbourne, VIC, Australia. , (Australia)
  • 16 Centre for Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Melbourne School of Population and Global Health, The University of Melbourne, Melbourne, VIC, Australia. , (Australia)
  • 17 WA Centre for Health & Ageing, Centre for Medical Research, Harry Perkins Institute of Medical Research, Perth, WA, Australia. , (Australia)
  • 18 Department of Geriatric Medicine, Royal Perth Hospital, Perth, WA, Australia. , (Australia)
  • 19 Department of Epidemiology, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, Boston, MA.
  • 20 Channing Division of Network Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA.
  • 21 Department of Nutrition, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, Boston, MA.
  • 22 Section of Nutrition and Metabolism, International Agency for Research on Cancer, Lyon, France. , (France)
  • 23 Division of Research, Kaiser Permanente Northern California, Oakland, CA.
  • 24 Department of Biobank Research, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden. , (Sweden)
  • 25 Keck School of Medicine, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA.
  • 26 Nuffield Department of Surgery, University of Oxford, Oxford, United Kingdom. , (United Kingdom)
  • 27 IGFs & Metabolic Endocrinology Group, Translational Health Sciences, Bristol Medical School, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Bristol, Bristol, United Kingdom. , (United Kingdom)
  • 28 Genetic Epidemiology Group, International Agency for Research on Cancer, Lyon, France. , (France)
  • 29 Division of Cancer Epidemiology, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg, Germany. , (Germany)
  • 30 Department of Environmental Epidemiology, University of Occupational and Environmental Health, Kitakyushu, Japan. , (Japan)
  • 31 National Institute for Health Research Bristol Biomedical Research Unit in Nutrition, Bristol, United Kingdom. , (United Kingdom)
  • 32 Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, NY.
  • 33 University of Hawaii Cancer Center, Honolulu, HI.
  • 34 Medical Research Council/University of Bristol Integrative Epidemiology Unit, University of Bristol, Bristol, United Kingdom. , (United Kingdom)
  • 35 Department of Neurology, University of Tennessee Health Science Center, Memphis, TN.
  • 36 Japanese Red Cross Kyoto Daiichi Hospital, Kyoto, Japan. , (Japan)
  • 37 Chemical Pathology Directorate, SA Pathology, Adelaide, SA, Australia. , (Australia)
  • 38 Cancer Prevention Program, Public Health Sciences Division, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle, WA.
  • 39 Department of Health Sciences, University of York and the Hull York Medical School, York, UK.
  • 40 Department of Public Health, Section for Epidemiology, Aarhus University, Aarhus, Denmark. , (Denmark)
  • 41 Radiation Effects Research Foundation, Hiroshima, Japan. , (Japan)
  • 42 Epidemiology and Prevention Unit, Fondazione IRCCS Istituto Nazionale dei Tumori di Milano, Milan, Italy. , (Italy)
  • 43 Department of Medicine and Oncology, McGill University, Montreal, QC, Canada. , (Canada)
  • 44 Segal Cancer Centre, Jewish General Hospital, Montreal, QC, Canada. , (Canada)
  • 45 Department of Surgical Sciences, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden. , (Sweden)
  • 46 Hokkaido University Faculty of Medicine, Hokkaido, Japan. , (Japan)
  • 47 Department of Medical Biosciences and Pathology, Umea University, Umea, Sweden. , (Sweden)
  • 48 Hellenic Health Foundation, Athens, Greece. , (Greece)
  • 49 Department of Hygiene and Epidemiology, School of Medicine, University of Ioannina, Ioannina, Greece. , (Greece)
  • 50 Department of Endocrinology and Diabetes, Fiona Stanley Hospital, Perth, WA, Australia. , (Australia)
  • 51 Clinical Trial Service Unit and Epidemiological Studies Unit, Nuffield Department of Population Health, University of Oxford, Oxford, United Kingdom. , (United Kingdom)
Type
Published Article
Journal
International Journal of Cancer
Publisher
Wiley (John Wiley & Sons)
Publication Date
Dec 15, 2019
Volume
145
Issue
12
Pages
3244–3256
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1002/ijc.32276
PMID: 30873591
Source
Medline
Keywords
Language
English
License
Unknown

Abstract

Insulin-like growth factors (IGFs) and insulin-like growth factor binding proteins (IGFBPs) have been implicated in the aetiology of several cancers. To better understand whether anthropometric, behavioural and sociodemographic factors may play a role in cancer risk via IGF signalling, we examined the cross-sectional associations of these exposures with circulating concentrations of IGFs (IGF-I and IGF-II) and IGFBPs (IGFBP-1, IGFBP-2 and IGFBP-3). The Endogenous Hormones, Nutritional Biomarkers and Prostate Cancer Collaborative Group dataset includes individual participant data from 16,024 male controls (i.e. without prostate cancer) aged 22-89 years from 22 prospective studies. Geometric means of protein concentrations were estimated using analysis of variance, adjusted for relevant covariates. Older age was associated with higher concentrations of IGFBP-1 and IGFBP-2 and lower concentrations of IGF-I, IGF-II and IGFBP-3. Higher body mass index was associated with lower concentrations of IGFBP-1 and IGFBP-2. Taller height was associated with higher concentrations of IGF-I and IGFBP-3 and lower concentrations of IGFBP-1. Smokers had higher concentrations of IGFBP-1 and IGFBP-2 and lower concentrations of IGFBP-3 than nonsmokers. Higher alcohol consumption was associated with higher concentrations of IGF-II and lower concentrations of IGF-I and IGFBP-2. African Americans had lower concentrations of IGF-II, IGFBP-1, IGFBP-2 and IGFBP-3 and Hispanics had lower IGF-I, IGF-II and IGFBP-3 than non-Hispanic whites. These findings indicate that a range of anthropometric, behavioural and sociodemographic factors are associated with circulating concentrations of IGFs and IGFBPs in men, which will lead to a greater understanding of the mechanisms through which these factors influence cancer risk. © 2019 The Authors. International Journal of Cancer published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of UICC.

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