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Association of Sleep Duration with Stroke in Diabetic Patients: Analysis of the National Health Interview Survey.

Authors
  • Akinseye, Oluwaseun A1
  • Ojike, Nwakile I2
  • Akinseye, Leah I3
  • Dhandapany, Perundurai S4
  • Pandi-Perumal, Seithikurippu R5
  • 1 Department of Internal Medicine, Queens Hospital Center, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, Jamaica, New York; CUNY School of Public Health at Brooklyn College, New York, New York. Electronic address: [email protected] , (Jamaica)
  • 2 Department of Population Health, Center for Behavioral Healthful Change, NYU School of Medicine, New York, New York.
  • 3 CUNY School of Public Health at Brooklyn College, New York, New York.
  • 4 The Knight Cardiovascular Institute, Departments of Medicine, Molecular and Medical Genetics, Oregon Health and Science University, Portland, Oregon; Centre for Cardiovascular Biology and Disease, Institute for Stem Cell Biology and Regenerative Medicine (inStem), Bangalore, India. , (India)
  • 5 Department of Health & Nutrition Sciences, Somnogen Canada Inc., Toronto, Ontario, Canada. , (Canada)
Type
Published Article
Journal
Journal of stroke and cerebrovascular diseases : the official journal of National Stroke Association
Publication Date
Mar 01, 2016
Volume
25
Issue
3
Pages
650–655
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1016/j.jstrokecerebrovasdis.2015.11.023
PMID: 26738814
Source
Medline
Keywords
Language
English
License
Unknown

Abstract

Habitual sleep duration is increasingly being recognized as an important risk factor for stroke. We sought to describe the association between sleep duration and stroke in a cohort of individuals with diabetes. Data from the National Health Interview Survey for the years 2004-2013 were used. Only those answering "yes" to the question "Have you EVER been told by a doctor or other health professional that you have diabetes or sugar diabetes?" were included in the analysis. Sleep duration was categorized as short (≤6 hours), normal (7-8 hours), or long (≥9 hours). Self-reported diagnosis of stroke was the main outcome of interest. A total number of 26,364 self-reported diabetic individuals provided data for analysis. Stroke was reported in 9.1% of short sleepers, 16.1% of long sleepers, and 8.3% of normative sleepers (P < .05). In the unadjusted model, short and long sleepers had an increased odds of stroke compared to normal sleepers (odds ratio [OR] = 1.12, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.02-1.23, P = .01; and OR = 2.18, 95% CI: 1.96-2.42, P = .01; respectively), but the association between short sleep and stroke became nonsignificant after multivariate adjustment (OR = 1.15, 95% CI: .95-1.40, P = .16) except in white participants. The association between long sleep duration and stroke persisted (OR = 1.46, 95% CI: 1.16-1.84, P = .01), especially in males (OR = 1.62, 95% CI: 1.14-2.28) and in white participants (OR = 1.97, 95% CI: 1.47-2.65). In diabetic patients, abnormal sleep duration was associated with increased risk of stroke, and this association varied among different sex and ethnic groups. Copyright © 2016 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

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