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Association of overweight and obesity with cumulative live birth rates according to women's age: A cohort study of 26 567 treatment cycles.

Authors
  • Cai, He1
  • Xue, Xia1
  • Liu, Xiaohua1
  • Bai, Haiyan1
  • Shi, Juanzi1
  • 1 Assisted Reproduction Center, Northwest Women's and Children's Hospital, Xi'an, China. , (China)
Type
Published Article
Journal
International journal of gynaecology and obstetrics: the official organ of the International Federation of Gynaecology and Obstetrics
Publication Date
Feb 01, 2024
Volume
164
Issue
2
Pages
578–586
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1002/ijgo.15071
PMID: 37688321
Source
Medline
Keywords
Language
English
License
Unknown

Abstract

To evaluate the effect of age on the association between maternal body mass index (BMI) and cumulative live birth rates (CLBRs) following in vitro fertilization treatment. We retrospectively analyzed the data of 26 567 women undergoing in vitro fertilization/intracytoplasmic sperm injection from 2016 to 2019. We conducted multivariate regression analysis of the association between CLBRs and maternal BMI and age category. A total of 16 626 (62.58%) patients achieved a live birth. Women with obesity had significantly decreased CLBRs compared with women who had normal weight (odds ratio [OR] 0.73 [95% confidence interval (CI), 0.66-0.80]). The significant interaction between age and BMI suggested that the impact of BMI on CLBRs was moderated by women's age (P interaction <0.001). The association between obesity and CLBRs was inverse among women aged <30 years (OR, 0.63 [95% CI, 0.54-0.73]), 30 to 34 years (OR, 0.79 [95% CI, 0.67-0.93]), and 35 to 37 years (OR, 0.71 [95% CI, 0.52-0.98]); however, decreases in CLBRs with obesity were not observed in women aged 38 to 40 years (OR, 1.17 [95% CI, 0.70-1.94]) and ≥ 41 years (OR, 1.25 [95% CI, 0.53-2.96]). Maternal obesity was significantly associated with a lower likelihood of having a live birth, but the risk differed according to women's age. A higher BMI might have a less-pronounced detrimental effect with increasing age. © 2023 International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics.

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