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Association of diet and anthropometric measures as cardiovascular modifiable risk factors in young adults

Authors
  • Mishra, Soumya
  • Banerjee, Swasti
  • Sengupta, Tridip Kumar
  • Behera, Anugya Aparajita
  • Manjareeka, Magna
  • Mishra, Jayanti
Type
Published Article
Journal
Journal of Basic and Clinical Physiology and Pharmacology
Publisher
De Gruyter
Publication Date
Dec 18, 2013
Volume
25
Issue
4
Pages
351–358
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1515/jbcpp-2013-0128
Source
De Gruyter
Keywords
License
Yellow

Abstract

Background: Cardiovascular accidents are the major cause of death in the developing world, accounting for nearly 40% of deaths in adult men and women. Developed countries have already brought this under control, whereas India has to take a giant leap. Diet plays a pivotal role among the various modifiable cardiovascular risk factors. The sole objective of this study is to point at nutrition as being the main modulator of different anthropometric parameters and directly or indirectly has a tremendous impact on the blood pressure levels even during young age. Methods: In a cross-sectional study involving 223 young adults, the pattern of food habits and level of physical activity were determined from self-reported questionnaires, while blood pressure, weight, height, waist circumference (WC), and hip circumference were measured, and body mass index (BMI) and waist-to-hip ratio (WHR) were computed. The subjects were grouped as normotensives and prehypertensives and also were compared according to their BMI and other parameters. Results: Statistically significant, greater association of weight followed by WC with the prehypertensive levels of blood pressure compared to other parameters was seen. The subjects detected as prehypertensives had predilection for salty, fried, oily, sweet, and fast food; BMI >25 kg/m2; and WC and WHR in high risk-categories per World Health Organization standards. More than 69% of subjects had high WHR, whereas only 9% of total subjects exercised regularly. Conclusions: Central obesity is associated with sedentary life and high intake of calories, leading to hypertension with advancing age. Early detection, awareness, and primary prevention would help reduce morbidity and mortality associated with cardiovascular diseases.

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