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Association of clinical measures of periodontal disease with blood pressure and hypertension among postmenopausal women.

Authors
  • Gordon, Joshua H1
  • LaMonte, Michael J1
  • Genco, Robert J2, 3
  • Zhao, Jiwei4
  • Cimato, Thomas R5
  • Hovey, Kathleen M1
  • Wactawski-Wende, Jean1
  • 1 Department of Epidemiology and Environmental Health, School of Public Health and Health Professions, University at Buffalo, State University of New York, Buffalo, NY.
  • 2 Department of Oral Biology, School of Dental Medicine, University at Buffalo, State University of New York, Buffalo, NY.
  • 3 Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Jacobs School of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, University at Buffalo, State University of New York, Buffalo, NY.
  • 4 Department of Biostatistics, School of Public Health and Health Professions, University at Buffalo, State University of New York, Buffalo, NY.
  • 5 Department of Medicine/Division of Cardiology, Jacobs School of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, University at Buffalo, State University of New York, Buffalo, NY.
Type
Published Article
Journal
Journal of Periodontology
Publisher
American Academy of Periodontology
Publication Date
Oct 01, 2018
Volume
89
Issue
10
Pages
1193–1202
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1002/JPER.17-0562
PMID: 29802640
Source
Medline
Keywords
Language
English
License
Unknown

Abstract

Hypertension and periodontal disease are common conditions among postmenopausal women. Periodontal disease has been found associated with hypertension in previous studies, but data in postmenopausal women is limited. We assessed the cross-sectional associations of clinically measured periodontal disease with prevalent hypertension and measured systolic blood pressure (SBP) among 1341 postmenopausal women enrolled in the Buffalo Osteoporosis and Periodontal Disease (OsteoPerio) study, an ancillary study of the Women's Health Initiative-Observational Study. Clinical attachment level (CAL) and number of teeth missing were positively associated with SBP among those not taking antihypertensive medication in crude and multivariable adjusted linear regression models (both P < 0.05). Alveolar crestal height (ACH) and gingival bleeding on probing were associated with higher SBP in crude but not multivariable adjusted models. Neither probing pocket depth (PPD) nor severity categories of periodontitis were associated with SBP. Number of teeth missing was significantly associated with prevalent hypertension in crude and multivariable adjusted models (OR = 1.14, per 5 teeth; P = 0.04). ACH was associated with prevalent hypertension in crude but not adjusted models. CAL, PPD, gingival bleeding, and severity of periodontitis were not significantly associated with prevalent hypertension. These results suggest that measures of oral health including CAL and number of teeth missing are associated with blood pressure in postmenopausal women. Prospective studies are needed to further investigate these associations and the potential underlying mechanisms for these relationships. © 2018 American Academy of Periodontology.

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