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Association between long term exposure to particulate matter and incident hypertension in Spain

Authors
  • Doulatram-Gamgaram, Viyey1
  • Valdés, Sergio1, 2
  • Maldonado-Araque, Cristina1, 2
  • Lago-Sampedro, Ana1, 2
  • Badía-Guillén, Rocío1
  • García-Escobar, Eva1, 2
  • García-Serrano, Sara1, 2
  • García-Vivanco, Marta3
  • Garrido, Juan Luis3
  • Theobald, Mark Richard3
  • Gil, Victoria3
  • Martín-Llorente, Fernando3
  • Calle-Pascual, Alfonso2, 4
  • Bordiu, Elena4
  • Castaño, Luis2, 5, 2
  • Delgado, Elías6
  • Franch-Nadal, Josep2, 7
  • Chaves, F. Javier2, 8
  • Montanya, Eduard2, 9
  • Galán-García, José Luis10
  • And 3 more
  • 1 Instituto de Investigación Biomédica de Málaga-IBIMA,
  • 2 Instituto de Salud Carlos III,
  • 3 Medioambientales Y Tecnológicas (CIEMAT)—División de Contaminación Atmosférica,
  • 4 Universidad Complutense (UCM),
  • 5 UPV/EHU,
  • 6 Instituto de Investigación Sanitaria del Principado de Asturias (ISPA),
  • 7 Unitat de Suport a la Recerca (IDIAP—Fundació Jordi Gol),
  • 8 Fundación de Investigación del Hospital Clínico de Valencia-INCLIVA,
  • 9 Bellvitge Biomedical Research Institute (IDIBELL), University of Barcelona,
  • 10 University of Málaga,
  • 11 Málaga Academy of Sciences, Málaga, Spain
Type
Published Article
Journal
Scientific Reports
Publisher
Springer Nature
Publication Date
Oct 05, 2021
Volume
11
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1038/s41598-021-99154-7
PMCID: PMC8492737
Source
PubMed Central
Keywords
Disciplines
  • Article
License
Unknown

Abstract

Exposure to air particulate matter has been linked with hypertension and blood pressure levels. The metabolic risks of air pollution could vary according to the specific characteristics of each area, and has not been sufficiently evaluated in Spain. We analyzed 1103 individuals, participants in a Spanish nationwide population based cohort study ([email protected]), who were free of hypertension at baseline (2008–2010) and completed a follow-up exam of the cohort (2016–2017). Cohort participants were assigned air pollution concentrations for particulate matter < 10 μm (PM10) and < 2.5 μm (PM2.5) during follow-up (2008–2016) obtained through modeling combined with measurements taken at air quality stations (CHIMERE chemistry-transport model). Mean and SD concentrations of PM10 and PM2.5 were 20.17 ± 3.91 μg/m3 and 10.83 ± 2.08 μg/m3 respectively. During follow-up 282 cases of incident hypertension were recorded. In the fully adjusted model, compared with the lowest quartile of PM10, the multivariate weighted ORs (95% CIs) for developing hypertension with increasing PM10 exposures were 0.82 (0.59–1.14), 1.28 (0.93–1.78) and 1.45 (1.05–2.01) in quartile 2, 3 and 4 respectively ( p for a trend of 0.003). The corresponding weighted ORs according to PM2.5 exposures were 0.80 (0.57–1.13), 1.11 (0.80–1.53) and 1.48 (1.09–2.00) ( p for trend 0.004). For each 5-μg/m3 increment in PM10 and PM2.5 concentrations, the odds for incident hypertension increased 1.22 (1.06–1.41) p = 0.007 and 1.39 (1.07–1.81) p = 0.02 respectively. In conclusion, our study contributes to assessing the impact of particulate pollution on the incidence of hypertension in Spain, reinforcing the need for improving air quality as much as possible in order to decrease the risk of cardiometabolic disease in the population.

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