Affordable Access

deepdyve-link
Publisher Website

Association between household size and COVID-19: A UK Biobank observational study.

Authors
  • Gillies, Clare L1, 2, 3
  • Rowlands, Alex V2, 4
  • Razieh, Cameron1, 2, 4
  • Nafilyan, Vahé5
  • Chudasama, Yogini1, 2, 3
  • Islam, Nazrul6
  • Zaccardi, Francesco1, 2, 3
  • Ayoubkhani, Daniel5
  • Lawson, Claire1
  • Davies, Melanie J2, 4
  • Yates, Tom2, 4
  • Khunti, Kamlesh1, 2, 3, 4
  • 1 Leicester Real World Evidence Unit, Diabetes Research Centre, Leicester, LE5 4PW, UK.
  • 2 Diabetes Research Centre, Leicester Diabetes Centre, Leicester General Hospital, Leicester, LE5 4PW, UK.
  • 3 NIHR Applied Research Collaboration - East Midlands (ARC-EM), Leicester General Hospital, Leicester, LE5 4PW, UK.
  • 4 National Institute for Health Research (NIHR), Leicester Biomedical Research Centre (BRC), Leicester General Hospital, Leicester, LE5 4PW, UK.
  • 5 Office for National Statistics, Government Buildings, Newport, South Wales, NP10 8XG, UK.
  • 6 Nuffield Department of Population Health, University of Oxford, Oxford, OX1 2JD, UK.
Type
Published Article
Journal
Journal of the Royal Society of Medicine
Publisher
SAGE Publications
Publication Date
Apr 01, 2022
Volume
115
Issue
4
Pages
138–144
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1177/01410768211073923
PMID: 35118908
Source
Medline
Keywords
Language
English
License
Unknown

Abstract

To assess the association between household size and risk of non-severe or severe COVID-19. A longitudinal observational study. This study utilised UK Biobank linked to national SARS-CoV-2 laboratory test data. 401,910 individuals with available data on household size in UK Biobank. Household size was categorised as single occupancy, two-person households and households of three or more. Severe COVID-19 was defined as a positive SARS-CoV-2 test on hospital admission or death with COVID-19 recorded as the underlying cause; and non-severe COVID-19 as a positive test from a community setting. Logistic regression models were fitted to assess associations, adjusting for potential confounders. Of 401,910 individuals, 3612 (1%) were identified as having suffered from a severe COVID-19 infection and 11,264 (2.8%) from a non-severe infection, between 16 March 2020 and 16 March 2021. Overall, the odds of severe COVID-19 was significantly higher among individuals living alone (adjusted odds ratio: 1.24 [95% confidence interval: 1.14 to 1.36], or living in a household of three or more individuals (adjusted odds ratio: 1.28 [1.17 to 1.39], when compared to individuals living in a household of two. For non-severe COVID-19 infection, individuals living in a single-occupancy household had lower odds compared to those living in a household of two (adjusted odds ratio: 0.88 [0.82 to 0.93]. Odds of severe or non-severe COVID-19 infection were associated with household size. Increasing understanding of why certain households are more at risk is important for limiting spread of the infection.

Report this publication

Statistics

Seen <100 times