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An assessment of the use of antihistamines in the management of atopic dermatitis.

Authors
  • He, Alice1
  • Feldman, Steven R2
  • Fleischer, Alan B Jr.3
  • 1 Center for Dermatology Research, Department of Dermatology, Wake Forest School of Medicine, Winston-Salem, North Carolina.
  • 2 Center for Dermatology Research, Department of Dermatology, Wake Forest School of Medicine, Winston-Salem, North Carolina; Department of Pathology, Wake Forest School of Medicine, Winston-Salem, North Carolina; Department of Public Health Sciences, Wake Forest School of Medicine, Winston-Salem, North Carolina. Electronic address: [email protected]
  • 3 Department of Surgery, University of Kentucky College of Medicine, Lexington, Kentucky.
Type
Published Article
Journal
Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology
Publication Date
Jan 06, 2018
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1016/j.jaad.2017.12.077
PMID: 29317281
Source
Medline
Keywords
License
Unknown

Abstract

Antihistamines are widely used for the treatment of AD. There is no high-level evidence to suggest that nonsedating antihistamines reduce itch in patients with AD or that sedating antihistamines provide benefit in controlling AD symptoms (except perhaps sleep and AD comorbidities, such as allergic rhinitis).

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