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Assessment of eco-hydrological parameters for important sympodial bamboo species in Himalayan foothills

Authors
  • Kaushal, Rajesh1
  • Kumar, Ambrish1
  • Alam, N. M.1
  • Singh, I.1
  • Mandal, D.1
  • Tomar, J. M. S.1
  • Mehta, H.1
  • Lepcha, S. T. S.2
  • Long, T. T.3
  • Durai, Jayaraman3
  • 1 ICAR-Indian Institute of Soil and Water Conservation, Dehradun, 248 195, India , Dehradun (India)
  • 2 Ministry of Agriculture & Farmers Welfare, New Delhi, India , New Delhi (India)
  • 3 International Network on Bamboo and Rattan (INBAR), Beijing, China , Beijing (China)
Type
Published Article
Journal
Environmental Monitoring and Assessment
Publisher
Springer-Verlag
Publication Date
Jul 05, 2021
Volume
193
Issue
8
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1007/s10661-021-09231-7
Source
Springer Nature
Keywords
Disciplines
  • Article
License
Yellow

Abstract

Bamboos due to high soil water conservation potential are gaining increased attention in plantation programs across the globe. Large-scale plantation of fast-growing bamboo, however, can have important hydrological consequences. The study aims to quantify the eco-hydrological parameters, viz., throughfall (TF), stemflow (SF), and interception (I) in seven important sympodial bamboo species in north western Himalayan foothills of India. The species selected include Bambusa balcooa, Bambusa bambos, Bambusa vulgaris., Bambusa nutans, Dendrocalamus hamiltonii, Dendrocalamus stocksii, and Dendrocalamus strictus. Throughfall versus gross rainfall (GR) relationship in different species indicated high throughfall production during high rainfall events with r2 > 0.90. Average throughfall was lowest (62.1%) in D. hamiltonii and highest in B. vulgaris (74.6%). SF ranged from 1.32% in B. nutans to 3.39% in D. hamiltonii. The correlation coefficient (r) between leaf area index (LAI), number of culms, and crown area with the interception were 0.746, 0.691, and 0.585, respectively. The funneling ratio (F) was highest (27.0) in D. hamiltonii and least in B. nutans. Canopy storage capacity was highest in D. strictus (3.57 mm) and least in D. hamiltonii (1.09 mm). Interception loss was highest (34.4%) in D. hamiltonii and lowest in B. vulgaris (23.5%) and D. strictus (23.6%). Higher interception in bamboos make them suitable for soil conservation, but careful selection of species is required in low rainfall areas.

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