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Assessment of cultural sensitivity of cancer information in ethnic print media.

Authors
  • Friedman, Daniela B
  • Hoffman-Goetz, Laurie
Type
Published Article
Journal
Journal of health communication
Publication Date
Jun 01, 2006
Volume
11
Issue
4
Pages
425–447
Identifiers
PMID: 16720539
Source
Medline
License
Unknown

Abstract

Ethnic minority populations prefer cancer information that is respectful of their customs and beliefs about health and illness. Community newspapers are an important source of cancer information for ethnic groups. Our purpose is to evaluate the cultural sensitivity of cancer information in mass print media targeting ethnic minority readership. We assessed for cultural sensitivity 27 cancer articles published in English-language ethnic newspapers (Jewish, First Nations, Black/Caribbean, East Indian) in 2000 using the Cultural Sensitivity Assessment Tool (CSAT). We found that the overall average CSAT score of 27 cancer articles was 2.71. (Scores<2.50 were classified as culturally insensitive.) Articles in First Nations newspapers were more culturally sensitive according to the CSAT (X=2.86), followed by articles in Black/Caribbean (X=2.79) and Jewish (X=2.78) papers. Cancer articles from East Indian newspapers had a mean CSAT score of 2.30 and were classified as culturally insensitive. Four articles were considered culturally sensitive but did not mention ethnic populations as intended readers or as high-risk groups for cancer. We found that, using the CSAT measure, overall, cancer articles in ethnic newspapers included in this study were culturally sensitive. Given limitations of this instrument, we recommend an additional checklist for evaluating the cultural sensitivity of printed cancer information.

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