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Assessing the Nature and Impact of Observed Stellar Variability on Kepler s Ability to Detect Earth-Size Planets

Authors
  • G, Basri
  • D L, Buzasi
  • M R, Haas
  • S B, Howell
  • Peter Tenenbaum
  • L M, Walkowicz
  • W F, Welsh
  • Jon Michael, Jenkins
  • E W, Dunham
  • V S, Argabright
  • W J, Borucki
  • Douglas Caldwell
  • W J, Chaplin
  • J L, Christiansen
  • T N, Gautier
  • R L, Gilliland
  • J, Kolodziejczak
  • P, Machalek
  • Jeffrey Van Cleve
Volume
2
Pages
1914–1914
Source
SETI Institute
License
Unknown

Abstract

The Kepler spacecraft was launched on March 6 2009 on a 3.5-year mission to determine the frequency of Earth-size and larger planets in or near the habitable zones of their stars. Kepler has been observing 160,000 stars to detect transiting planets for over two years and has discovered more than 16 confirmed or validated planets and has identified over 1200 candidate planets. There is sufficient data and experience with the photometer to characterize Kepler s ability to detect weak signatures of small, terrestrial planets. The ...

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