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Asbestos causes stimulation of the extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1 mitogen-activated protein kinase cascade after phosphorylation of the epidermal growth factor receptor.

Authors
  • Zanella, C L
  • Posada, J
  • Tritton, T R
  • Mossman, B T
Type
Published Article
Journal
Cancer research
Publication Date
Dec 01, 1996
Volume
56
Issue
23
Pages
5334–5338
Identifiers
PMID: 8968079
Source
Medline
License
Unknown

Abstract

Asbestos fibers are human carcinogens with undefined mechanisms of action. In studies here, we examined signal transduction events induced by asbestos in target cells of mesothelioma and potential cell surface origins for these cascades. Asbestos fibers, but not their nonfibrous analogues, induced protracted phosphorylation of the mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinases and extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERK) 1 and 2, and increased kinase activity of ERK2. ERK1 and ERK2 phosphorylation and activity were initiated by addition of exogenous epidermal growth factor (EGF) and transforming growth factor-alpha, but not by isoforms of platelet-derived growth factor or insulin-like growth factor-1 in mesothelial cells. MAP kinase activation by asbestos was attenuated by suramin, which inhibits growth factor receptor interactions, or tyrphostin AG 1478, a specific inhibitor of EGF receptor tyrosine kinase activity (IC50 = 3 nM). Moreover, asbestos caused autophosphorylation of the EGF receptor, an event triggering the ERK cascade. These studies are the first to establish that a MAP kinase signal transduction pathway is initiated after phosphorylation of a peptide growth factor receptor following exposure to asbestos fibers.

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