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A Modified Technique of Arthroscopically Assisted AC Joint Reconstruction and Preliminary Results

Authors
  • Tomlinson, Daniel P.1
  • Altchek, David W.1
  • Davila, Jeffrey1
  • Cordasco, Frank A.1
  • 1 Hospital for Special Surgery, 535 E 70th Street, New York, NY, 10021, USA , New York (United States)
Type
Published Article
Journal
Clinical Orthopaedics and Related Research
Publisher
Ovid Technologies (Wolters Kluwer) - Lippincott Williams & Wilkins
Publication Date
Feb 10, 2008
Volume
466
Issue
3
Pages
639–645
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1007/s11999-007-0085-3
Source
Springer Nature
Keywords
License
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Abstract

Surgical treatment of high-grade acromioclavicular (AC) joint separations has become analogous to ligament reconstructions elsewhere in the body with the goal being restoration of the native anatomy. Circumferential access to the base of the coracoid is essential to reconstruct the coracoclavicular ligament complex. Using some of the traditional open approaches, this access requires detaching the deltoid insertion and performing extensive soft tissue dissection. Also, poor visualization risks injury to nearby neurovascular structures. An arthroscopically assisted reconstruction offers the advantage of less soft tissue dissection and superior visualization to the base of the coracoid. We have developed a unique arthroscopically assisted technique that uses a subacromial approach to pass suture material and a tendon graft around the coracoid to reconstruct the coracoclavicular ligament complex. We describe our technique and preliminary results in 10 patients who have undergone coracoclavicular ligament reconstruction for high-grade AC separation. All patients improved subjectively with regard to pain and function at a minimum followup of 3 months (mean, 5 months; range, 3–18 months). This arthroscopically assisted technique has the potential to allow for safe and at least in the short term reliable restoration of the coracoclavicular ligament complex and provides an alternative technique to treat AC joint separations. Level of Evidence: Level IV, therapeutic study. See the Guidelines for Authors for a complete description of levels of evidence.

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