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Arsenic Phytoremediation in Contaminated and Flooded Soil: Accumulation and Translocation in Two Macrophytes

Authors
  • Ferreira, Amanda Duim1
  • Viana, Douglas Gomes1
  • Pires, Fábio Ribeiro2
  • Egreja Filho, Fernando Barboza3
  • Soares, Matheus Bortolanza1
  • de Carvalho, Cássio Francisco Moreira2
  • Bonomo, Robson2
  • Cruz, Leila Beatriz Silva4
  • Nascimento, Mauro César Pinto4
  • 1 University of São Paulo, Piracicaba, São Paulo, Brazil , Piracicaba (Brazil)
  • 2 Federal University of Espírito Santo, São Mateus, ES, Brazil , São Mateus (Brazil)
  • 3 ICEx - Federal University of Minas Gerais, Belo Horizonte, MG, Brazil , Belo Horizonte (Brazil)
  • 4 Environmental Engineering Area of Petrobras (E&P-UO-ES/SMS/MA), Vitória, ES, Brazil , Vitória (Brazil)
Type
Published Article
Journal
Water Air & Soil Pollution
Publisher
Springer-Verlag
Publication Date
Jul 08, 2021
Volume
232
Issue
7
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1007/s11270-021-05257-2
Source
Springer Nature
Keywords
Disciplines
  • Article
License
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Abstract

Few aquatic plants can accumulate As from flooded soils. Given the high toxicity and bioavailability of As in these environments, a study was carried out in Brazil to test the As phytoextraction potential of Typha domingensis and Eleocharis acutangula, comprising three cutting/regrowth cycles of 120 days each. The species were grown in uncontaminated (control), moderately contaminated (75 mg kg−1 As), and highly contaminated (250 mg kg−1 As) soil. The amount of As extracted was influenced by the level of As contamination and the plant species. E. acutangula was the most suitable species for removing As from moderately contaminated soil (up to 75 mg kg−1), while T. domingensis could remove As from soil with As levels up to 250 mg kg−1. This small-scale study provides a theoretical basis for the selection of macrophytes with potential for As extraction from soils, and these species should be tested in the future under field conditions.

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