Affordable Access

deepdyve-link
Publisher Website

Archaeal ammonia oxidizers respond to soil factors at smaller spatial scales than the overall archaeal community does in a high Arctic polar oasis.

Authors
  • Banerjee, Samiran1, 2
  • Kennedy, Nabla3
  • Richardson, Alan E2
  • Egger, Keith N3
  • Siciliano, Steven D1
  • 1 a Department of Soil Science, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, SK S7N 5A8, Canada. , (Canada)
  • 2 b CSIRO Agriculture, Crace, ACT 2911, Australia. , (Australia)
  • 3 c Ecosystem Science & Management Program, University of Northern British Columbia, Prince George, BC V2N 4Z9, Canada. , (Canada)
Type
Published Article
Journal
Canadian Journal of Microbiology
Publisher
Canadian Science Publishing
Publication Date
Jun 01, 2016
Volume
62
Issue
6
Pages
485–491
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1139/cjm-2015-0669
PMID: 27045904
Source
Medline
Keywords
License
Unknown

Abstract

Archaea are ubiquitous and highly abundant in Arctic soils. Because of their oligotrophic nature, archaea play an important role in biogeochemical processes in nutrient-limited Arctic soils. With the existing knowledge of high archaeal abundance and functional potential in Arctic soils, this study employed terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (t-RFLP) profiling and geostatistical analysis to explore spatial dependency and edaphic determinants of the overall archaeal (ARC) and ammonia-oxidizing archaeal (AOA) communities in a high Arctic polar oasis soil. ARC communities were spatially dependent at the 2-5 m scale (P < 0.05), whereas AOA communities were dependent at the ∼1 m scale (P < 0.0001). Soil moisture, pH, and total carbon content were key edaphic factors driving both the ARC and AOA community structure. However, AOA evenness had simultaneous correlations with dissolved organic nitrogen and mineral nitrogen, indicating a possible niche differentiation for AOA in which dry mineral and wet organic soil microsites support different AOA genotypes. Richness, evenness, and diversity indices of both ARC and AOA communities showed high spatial dependency along the landscape and resembled scaling of edaphic factors. The spatial link between archaeal community structure and soil resources found in this study has implications for predictive understanding of archaea-driven processes in polar oases.

Report this publication

Statistics

Seen <100 times