Affordable Access

Access to the full text

Aqueous enzymatic protein and lipid release from the microalgae Chlamydomonas reinhardtii

Authors
  • Soto-Sierra, Laura1, 2
  • Wilken, Lisa R.1
  • Dixon, Chelsea K.1
  • 1 Kansas State University, 1016 Seaton Hall, Manhattan, KS, 66506, USA , Manhattan (United States)
  • 2 Texas A&M University, 201 Scoates Hall, College Station, TX, 77843, USA , College Station (United States)
Type
Published Article
Journal
Bioresources and Bioprocessing
Publisher
Springer Singapore
Publication Date
Aug 08, 2020
Volume
7
Issue
1
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1186/s40643-020-00328-4
Source
Springer Nature
Keywords
License
Green

Abstract

Advances in biochemical and molecular manipulation have led to increased biomass productivity and oil accumulation in the microalgae C. reinhardtii. However, scalable processes for the recovery of oil and other valuable biomolecules, such as protein, from C. reinhardtii are scarce. The use of aqueous enzymatic extraction, a non-solvent and environmentally friendly bioproduct recovery method, provides an opportunity to design an integrated process for oil and protein fractionation to reduce bioenergy and bioproducts costs. Based on the mechanistic understanding of biomolecule distribution and compartmentalization, an aqueous enzymatic treatment for the release of internally stored lipid bodies was designed. Application of a C. reinhardtii-produced protease, autolysin, for lysis of the microalgae cell wall was followed by a secondary treatment with trypsin for chloroplast disruption and lipid body release. Protein recovery after the primary treatment with autolysin indicated a 50.1 ± 4.2% release of total soluble protein and localization of lipid bodies still in the chloroplast. The development of a secondary enzyme treatment (trypsin) for chloroplast and lipid body lysis demonstrated a high percent of remaining lipids (73 ± 7%) released into the supernatant. The results indicate that the application of an enzymatic treatment scheme for protein and oil recovery is a promising alternative to traditional extraction processes.

Report this publication

Statistics

Seen <100 times