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Applying Rawls to medical cases: an investigation into the usages of analytical philosophy.

Authors
  • Shevory, T C
Type
Published Article
Journal
Journal of health politics, policy and law
Publication Date
Jan 01, 1986
Volume
10
Issue
4
Pages
749–764
Identifiers
PMID: 3457860
Source
Medline
Keywords
License
Unknown

Abstract

During the past 15 years, John Rawls' A Theory of Justice (Harvard University Press; 1971) has influenced the literature on health policy, although Rawls did not address himself to this subject. Shevory attempts to evaluate the validity of Rawls' analytic approach by assessing its use by authors discussing the allocation of medical resources and other bioethical issues. He summarizes arguments grounded in the Rawlsian theory of justice in the writings of Norman Daniels, Nora Bell, Ronald Green, James Childress, Marc Basson, Gerald Winslow, John Troyer, Karen M. Tait, Marc Lappé, and others. Shevory categorizes Rawls' work as "a revised and very sophisticated version of older liberal theories of justice." As such, the open-endedness that accommodates competing claims of justice makes it very difficult to apply its principles to individual cases and to arrive at answers that can be used in formulating public policy.

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