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Application of whole genome shotgun sequencing for detection and characterization of genetically modified organisms and derived products.

Authors
  • Holst-Jensen, Arne1
  • Spilsberg, Bjørn2
  • Arulandhu, Alfred J3
  • Kok, Esther3
  • Shi, Jianxin4
  • Zel, Jana5
  • 1 Norwegian Veterinary Institute, Ullevaalsveien 68, P.O. Box 750, Sentrum, 0106, Oslo, Norway. [email protected] , (Norway)
  • 2 Norwegian Veterinary Institute, Ullevaalsveien 68, P.O. Box 750, Sentrum, 0106, Oslo, Norway. , (Norway)
  • 3 RIKILT, Wageningen UR, P.O. Box 230, 6700 AE, Wageningen, The Netherlands. , (Netherlands)
  • 4 Joint International Research Laboratory of Metabolic & Developmental Sciences, Shanghai Jiao Tong University-University of Adelaide Joint Centre for Agriculture and Health, School of Life Sciences and Biotechnology, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai, 200240, People's Republic of China. , (China)
  • 5 National Institute of Biology, Večna pot 111, 1000, Ljubljana, Slovenia. , (Slovenia)
Type
Published Article
Journal
Analytical and Bioanalytical Chemistry
Publisher
Springer-Verlag
Publication Date
Jul 01, 2016
Volume
408
Issue
17
Pages
4595–4614
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1007/s00216-016-9549-1
PMID: 27100228
Source
Medline
Keywords
License
Unknown

Abstract

The emergence of high-throughput, massive or next-generation sequencing technologies has created a completely new foundation for molecular analyses. Various selective enrichment processes are commonly applied to facilitate detection of predefined (known) targets. Such approaches, however, inevitably introduce a bias and are prone to miss unknown targets. Here we review the application of high-throughput sequencing technologies and the preparation of fit-for-purpose whole genome shotgun sequencing libraries for the detection and characterization of genetically modified and derived products. The potential impact of these new sequencing technologies for the characterization, breeding selection, risk assessment, and traceability of genetically modified organisms and genetically modified products is yet to be fully acknowledged. The published literature is reviewed, and the prospects for future developments and use of the new sequencing technologies for these purposes are discussed.

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