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Application and Efficiency of Transnasal Humidified Rapid-Insufflation Ventilatory Exchange in Laryngeal Microsurgery.

Authors
  • Huh, Gene1, 2
  • Min, Se-Hee3
  • Cho, Sung-Dong1, 2
  • Cho, Youn Joung4
  • Kwon, Seong Keun1, 2, 5, 6
  • 1 Department of Otorhinolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul, Republic of Korea. , (North Korea)
  • 2 Department of Otorhinolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul, Republic of Korea. , (North Korea)
  • 3 Department of Anesthesiology and Pain Medicine, Chung-Ang University Hospital, Chung-Ang University College of Medicine, Seoul, Republic of Korea. , (North Korea)
  • 4 Department of Anesthesiology and Pain Medicine, Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul, Republic of Korea. , (North Korea)
  • 5 Cancer Research Institute, Seoul National University, Seoul, Republic of Korea. , (North Korea)
  • 6 Sensory Organ Research Institute, Seoul National University Medical Research Center, Seoul, Republic of Korea. , (North Korea)
Type
Published Article
Journal
The Laryngoscope
Publisher
Wiley (John Wiley & Sons)
Publication Date
May 01, 2022
Volume
132
Issue
5
Pages
1061–1068
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1002/lary.29848
PMID: 34495557
Source
Medline
Keywords
Language
English
License
Unknown

Abstract

This study aimed to analyze the feasibility of transnasal humidified rapid-insufflation ventilatory exchange (THRIVE) during laryngeal microsurgery (LMS) and investigated its efficiency and application according to the location of the lesion. Retrospective chart review. Patients over 20 years of age who underwent LMS without underlying cardiac, pulmonary, or cerebrovascular disease were retrospectively reviewed. Overall, 54 patients with endotracheal intubation (ETI) and 44 patients with THRIVE were included. The operation and anesthesia time, induction and emergence time, oxygen saturation (SpO2 ), and transcutaneous carbon dioxide (TcCO2 ) levels were analyzed and compared between the two ventilation methods according to disease subsite. Compared with ETI, patients with THRIVE presented reduced operation time (16.3 ± 9.69 min vs. 21.9 ± 12.0 min), anesthesia time (33.6 ± 11.4 min vs. 45.4 ± 13.9 min), emergence time (6.73 ± 2.49 min vs. 8.52 ± 3.17 min), without significant decreases in SpO2 but with increased TcCO2 (10.9 ± 6.12% vs. 7.33 ± 3.86%). Comparing THRIVE to ETI for lesions at the glottis yielded similar findings, which were particularly more significant. However, lesions above the glottis presented no significant difference for any parameters between THRIVE and ETI groups. Lesions involving multiple subsites and prolonged operation time were risk factors for the intraoperative conversion of ventilation method. THRIVE is reliable for maintaining oxygenation during LMS and is efficient in reducing the operation and emergence times, leading to shorter anesthesia time, especially for lesions at the glottis. However, caution is required administering THRIVE, when lesion involves multiple subsites, and when operation time is prolonged. 3 Laryngoscope, 132:1061-1068, 2022. © 2021 The American Laryngological, Rhinological and Otological Society, Inc.

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