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Apolipoprotein E and Health in Older Men: The Concord Health and Ageing in Men Project.

Authors
  • Le Couteur, David G1, 2
  • Stanaway, Fiona3
  • Waite, Louise M1
  • Cullen, John1
  • Lindley, Richard I4
  • Blyth, Fiona M3
  • Naganathan, Vasi1, 2
  • Cumming, Robert G3
  • Handelsman, David J2
  • 1 Centre of Education and Research on Ageing, Ageing and Alzheimer's Institute, University of Sydney and Concord Hospital, Australia. , (Australia)
  • 2 ANZAC Research Institute, University of Sydney and Concord Hospital, Australia. , (Australia)
  • 3 School of Public Health, University of Sydney, Australia. , (Australia)
  • 4 Westmead Applied Research Centre, University of Sydney, and the George Institute for Global Health, Australia. , (Australia)
Type
Published Article
Journal
The journals of gerontology. Series A, Biological sciences and medical sciences
Publication Date
Sep 25, 2020
Volume
75
Issue
10
Pages
1858–1862
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1093/gerona/glaa105
PMID: 32342099
Source
Medline
Keywords
Language
English
License
Unknown

Abstract

APOE genotype has been associated with various age-related outcomes including Alzheimer's disease, frailty, and mortality. In this study, the relationship between health, particularly cognitive function, and APOE was investigated in older men from the Concord Health and Ageing in Men Project (n = 1,616; age 76.9 ± 5.5 years [range 70-97 years]; Australia). Baseline characteristics and survival up to 12 years were determined. Frailty was measured using Cardiovascular Health study (CHS) criteria and Rockwood frailty index, and cognition using Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE) and Addenbrookes Cognitive Examination. APOE ε4 was less common in the oldest men and those born in Mediterranean countries. APOE ε2 was beneficially associated with cholesterol, creatinine, gamma-glutamyl transaminase, glucose, and HDL cholesterol while APOE ε4 was adversely associated with cholesterol and albumin. APOE ε4 was associated with a clinical diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease when adjusted for age and region of birth (ε4 homozygotes Odds ratio (OR) 7.0; ε4 heterozygotes OR 2.4, p < .05), and APOE ε2 had a small positive association with cognition. On multivariate regression, overall cognitive function in the entire cohort was associated with age, country of birth, education, and frailty (all p < .001). APOE was not associated with frailty or survival. In conclusion, age and region of birth influenced distribution of APOE genotype in older men. Although APOE ε4 was associated with Alzheimer's disease, overall cognitive function in the cohort was associated more strongly with frailty than APOE genotype. © The Author(s) 2020. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Gerontological Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: [email protected]

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