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APOBEC: A molecular driver in cervical cancer pathogenesis.

Authors
  • Revathidevi, Sundaramoorthy1
  • Murugan, Avaniyapuram Kannan2
  • Nakaoka, Hirofumi3
  • Inoue, Ituro4
  • Munirajan, Arasambattu Kannan5
  • 1 Department of Genetics, Dr ALM PG Institute of Basic Medical Sciences, University of Madras, Chennai, 600113, India; Division of Human Genetics, National Institute of Genetics, Mishima, 411-8540, Japan. , (India)
  • 2 Department of Molecular Oncology, King Faisal Specialist Hospital and Research Centre, Riyadh, 11211, Saudi Arabia. , (Saudi Arabia)
  • 3 Division of Human Genetics, National Institute of Genetics, Mishima, 411-8540, Japan; Department of Cancer Genome Research, Sasaki Institute, Sasaki Foundation, Chiyoda-ku, 101-0062, Japan. , (Japan)
  • 4 Division of Human Genetics, National Institute of Genetics, Mishima, 411-8540, Japan. , (Japan)
  • 5 Department of Genetics, Dr ALM PG Institute of Basic Medical Sciences, University of Madras, Chennai, 600113, India. Electronic address: [email protected] , (India)
Type
Published Article
Journal
Cancer letters
Publication Date
Jan 01, 2021
Volume
496
Pages
104–116
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1016/j.canlet.2020.10.004
PMID: 33038491
Source
Medline
Keywords
Language
English
License
Unknown

Abstract

Cervical cancer is one of the foremost common cancers in women. Human papillomavirus (HPV) infection remains a major risk factor of cervical cancer. In addition, numerous other genetic and epigenetic factors also are involved in the underlying pathogenesis of cervical cancer. Recently, it has been reported that apolipoprotein B mRNA editing enzyme catalytic polypeptide like (APOBEC), DNA-editing protein plays an important role in the molecular pathogenesis of cancer. Particularly, the APOBEC3 family was shown to induce tumor mutations by aberrant DNA editing mechanism. In general, APOBEC3 enzymes play a pivotal role in the deamination of cytidine to uridine in DNA and RNA to control diverse biological processes such as regulation of protein expression, innate immunity, and embryonic development. Innate antiviral activity of the APOBEC3 family members restrict retroviruses, endogenous retro-element, and DNA viruses including the HPV that is the leading risk factor for cervical cancer. This review briefly describes the pathogenesis of cervical cancer and discusses in detail the recent findings on the role of APOBEC in the molecular pathogenesis of cervical cancer. Copyright © 2020 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

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