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Aphids-induced plant volatiles affect diel foraging behavior of a ladybird beetle Coccinella septempunctata.

Authors
  • Norkute, Milda1
  • Olsson, Ulf2
  • Ninkovic, Velemir1
  • 1 Department of Ecology, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala, Sweden. , (Sweden)
  • 2 Department of Energy and Technology, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala, Sweden. , (Sweden)
Type
Published Article
Journal
Insect Science
Publisher
Wiley (Blackwell Publishing)
Publication Date
Dec 01, 2020
Volume
27
Issue
6
Pages
1266–1275
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1111/1744-7917.12734
PMID: 31674720
Source
Medline
Keywords
Language
English
License
Unknown

Abstract

The ladybird beetle Coccinella septempunctata (L.) is an important biocontrol agent of pests such as various aphid species. Despite being one of the most studied coccinellid species, many aspects of its foraging behavior are still not completely understood. This study focuses on the diel foraging behavior of C. septempunctata, investigating their olfactory orientation toward aphid-infested plants, walking activity on plants and on the soil, and feeding rates. In the scotophase the ladybird beetles were significantly more attracted to the odor of aphid-infested plants, on which they also showed considerably higher walking activity then on uninfested controls. Females were more prone to utilize olfactory cues when searching for prey and fed at higher rates than males; this shows that they are better adapted to nocturnal activity, as they require higher food intake. Coccinella septempunctata have the same feeding rate during the scotophase as in the photophase. Our study shows that C. septempunctata has the potential to forage in the scotophase if prey is abundant. The results support the hypothesis that volatiles of aphid-infested plants can attract or arrest foraging adult ladybird beetles, even in the darkness, which makes a considerable contribution to efficient prey search and enhances feeding capacity. © 2019 The Authors. Insect Science published by John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd on behalf of Institute of Zoology, Chinese Academy of Sciences.

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