Affordable Access

Access to the full text

Are there any differential responses to concussive injury in civilian versus athletic populations: a neuroimaging study

Authors
  • Johnson, Brian1
  • Dodd, Andrew2
  • Mayer, Andrew R.2, 3
  • Hallett, Mark4
  • Slobounov, Semyon1, 5
  • 1 The Pennsylvania State University, 276, Recreation Building, University Park, PA, 16802, USA , University Park (United States)
  • 2 The Mind Research Network and Lovelace Biomedical and Environmental Research Institute, Albuquerque, NM, USA , Albuquerque (United States)
  • 3 University of New Mexico School of Medicine, Albuquerque, NM, USA , Albuquerque (United States)
  • 4 National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke, Bethesda, MD, 20892, USA , Bethesda (United States)
  • 5 Penn State Milton S. Hershey Medical Center, Hershey, PA, 17033, USA , Hershey (United States)
Type
Published Article
Journal
Brain Imaging and Behavior
Publisher
Springer-Verlag
Publication Date
Oct 25, 2018
Volume
14
Issue
1
Pages
110–117
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1007/s11682-018-9982-1
Source
Springer Nature
Keywords
License
Yellow

Abstract

Accurate identification and classification of patients suffering from mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) is a significant challenge faced by clinicians and researchers. To examine if there are different pathophysiological responses to concussive injury in different populations, evaluated here comparing collegiate athletes versus age-matched non-athletes. Resting-state fMRI data were acquired in the acute phase of concussion from 30 collegiate athletes and from 30 injury and age matched non-athletes. Resting-state functional connectivity measures revealed group differences with reduced connectivity in the anterior cingulate cortex (p < .05) and posterior cingulate cortex (p < 0.05) hubs of the Default Mode Network in the athletes. Given the known positive effects of exercise on brain functional reserves and neural efficiency concept, we expected less pronounced effect of concussion in athletic population. In contrast, there were significant decreases in functional connectivity in athletes that could be a result of previous repetitive subconcussive impacts and history of concussion.

Report this publication

Statistics

Seen <100 times