Antiviral Efficacy and Pharmacokinetics of Oral Adefovir Dipivoxil in Chronically Woodchuck Hepatitis Virus-Infected Woodchucks

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Antiviral Efficacy and Pharmacokinetics of Oral Adefovir Dipivoxil in Chronically Woodchuck Hepatitis Virus-Infected Woodchucks

Publisher
American Society for Microbiology
Publication Date
Oct 01, 2001
Source
PMC
Keywords
Disciplines
  • Biology
  • Chemistry
  • Design
  • Mathematics
  • Medicine
License
Unknown

Abstract

The antiviral efficacy of orally administered adefovir dipivoxil was evaluated in an 18-week study (12 weeks of treatment and 6 weeks of recovery) conducted with woodchucks chronically infected with woodchuck hepatitis virus (WHV). Adefovir dipivoxil is a prodrug of adefovir designed to enhance its oral bioavailability. Following administration of 15 mg of adefovir dipivoxil per kg of body weight in four WHV-infected animals, the mean maximum concentration of adefovir in serum was 0.462 μg/ml, with an elimination half-life of 10.2 h, and the oral bioavailability of adefovir was estimated to be 22.9% (±11.2%). To study antiviral efficacy, the animals were divided into three groups. There were six animals each in a high-dose group (15 mg/kg/day) and a low-dose group (5 mg/kg/day). A vehicle control group consisted of five animals because WHV DNA was detectable only by PCR at the time of the study in one of the original six animals. Efficacy was evaluated by determining the levels of WHV DNA in serum. The geometric mean WHV DNA level for the high-dose group diminished by >40-fold (>1.6 log10) after 2 weeks of treatment and >300-fold (>2.5 log10) at 12 weeks. There was a >10-fold reduction in five of six low-dose animals by 2 weeks, but levels were unchanged in one animal. By 12 weeks of treatment there was a >45-fold (>1.6 log10) reduction of WHV DNA levels, and serum WHV DNA levels were below the limit of quantification in three of six animals. Viral DNA levels returned to pretreatment levels during the 6-week recovery period. There were no clinically significant changes in body weight, hematology, or serum chemistry values, including bicarbonate or lactate, in any of the treated animals. No histologic evidence of liver injury was apparent in the biopsies. Under the conditions of this study, adefovir dipivoxil was an effective antihepadnaviral agent.

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