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Antioxidative and antimutagenic activity of yeast cell wall mannans in vitro.

Authors
  • Krizková, L
  • Duracková, Z
  • Sandula, J
  • Sasinková, V
  • Krajcovic, J
Type
Published Article
Journal
Mutation Research/Fundamental and Molecular Mechanisms of Mutagenesis
Publisher
Elsevier
Publication Date
Oct 18, 2001
Volume
497
Issue
1-2
Pages
213–222
Identifiers
PMID: 11525924
Source
Medline
License
Unknown

Abstract

Antioxidative and antimutagenic effect of yeast cell wall mannans, in particular, extracellular glucomannan (EC-GM) and glucomannan (GM-C.u.) both from Candida utilis, mannan from Saccharomyces cerevisiae (M-S.c.) and mannan from Candida albicans (M-C.a.) was evaluated. Luminol-dependent photochemical method using trolox as a standard showed that EC-GM, GM-C.u., M-S.c. and M-C.a. have relatively good antioxidative properties. EC-GM exhibited the highest antioxidative activity, followed by GM-C.u. and M-S.c. M-C.a. showed the least antioxidative activity. These mannans were experimentally confirmed to exhibit different, statistically significant antimutagenic activity in reducing damage of chloroplast DNA of the flagellate Euglena gracilis induced by ofloxacin and acridine orange (AO). We suggest that the antimutagenic effect of EC-GM, GM-C.u., M-S.c. and M-C.a. against ofloxacin is based on their ability to scavenge reactive oxygen radicals. With AO, the reduction of the chloroplast DNA lession could be a result of the absorptive capacity of the mannans. The important characteristics of mannans isolated from the yeast cell walls, such as good water solubility, relatively small molecular weight (15-30kDa), and antimutagenic effect exerted through different mode of action, appear to be a promising features for their prospective use as a natural protective (antimutagenic) agents.

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