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Antinuclear Antibodies in Systemic Sclerosis: an Update.

Authors
  • Stochmal, Anna1
  • Czuwara, Joanna1
  • Trojanowska, Maria2
  • Rudnicka, Lidia3
  • 1 Department of Dermatology, Medical University of Warsaw, Koszykowa 82A, 02-008, Warsaw, Poland. , (Poland)
  • 2 Arthritis Center, Boston University School of Medicine, Boston, MA, USA.
  • 3 Department of Dermatology, Medical University of Warsaw, Koszykowa 82A, 02-008, Warsaw, Poland. [email protected] , (Poland)
Type
Published Article
Journal
Clinical Reviews in Allergy & Immunology
Publisher
Springer-Verlag
Publication Date
Feb 01, 2020
Volume
58
Issue
1
Pages
40–51
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1007/s12016-018-8718-8
PMID: 30607749
Source
Medline
Keywords
Language
English
License
Unknown

Abstract

Systemic sclerosis is an autoimmune disease characterized by fibrosis of skin and internal organs, vasculopathy, and dysregulation of immune system. A diagnostically important feature of immunological abnormalities in systemic sclerosis is the presence of circulating antinuclear antibodies, which may be detected in 90-95% of patients with either of the four main laboratory methods: immunofluorescence, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, immunodiffusion, and immunoblotting. There are several antinuclear antibodies specific for systemic sclerosis. These include antibodies against topoisomerase (anti-TOPO I), kinetochore proteins (ACA), RNA polymerase enzyme (anti-RNAP III), ribonuclear proteins (anti-U11/U12 RNP, anti-U1 RNP, anti-U3 RNP) and nucleolar antigens (anti-Th/To, anti-NOR 90, anti-Ku, antiRuvBL1/2, and anti-PM/Scl). Autoantibodies specific for systemic sclerosis have been linked to distinct clinical features. Therefore, detecting a particular antibody type is important in predicting a possible organ involvement and prognosis and may have an impact on monitoring and treatment.

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