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[Antibiotic susceptibility to microorganisms isolated in blood cultures of patients an the Ignacio Chavez National Institute of Cardiology].

Authors
Type
Published Article
Journal
Revista de investigación clínica; organo del Hospital de Enfermedades de la Nutrición
Publication Date
Volume
46
Issue
4
Pages
267–277
Identifiers
PMID: 7973153
Source
Medline
License
Unknown

Abstract

A microdilution method was utilized for determining susceptibility to several antimicrobial agents in 142 bacterial blood culture isolates obtained during a one year period. Associated clinical features were also identified. Three cases of polymicrobial bacteriemia were found. Endocarditis was the most frequent source of bacteriemia (28.5%) and the viridans streptococci were the most frequently isolated microorganism (53%). Surprisingly, half of the bacteriemic episodes corresponded to a nosocomial infection most of which were due to staphylococci (25%) and Enterobacter sp (22%). Viridans streptococci group were 61.5% resistant to penicillin (MIC > 0.12 micrograms/mL). These strains also showed a 31% resistance to ceftriaxone (MIC > 8 micrograms/mL). The staphylococcal strains showed a 19% resistance to oxacillin; this resistance occurred for coagulase negative staphylococcis in 32% (6/19) and for S. aureus in 9% (2/22). All Gram-positive microorganisms were susceptible to vancomycin. The enterobacteria group were susceptible to most antimicrobial agents; nevertheless this group showed a 45% resistance to amikacin. In contrast, the non enterobacteria group were resistant to most of the antimicrobial agents tested except to imipenem, ceftazidime and ciprofloxacin. When comparing susceptibility longitudinally, no significative changes were identified, but a significant increase was found in MIC50-90 to amikacin and cephalothin when testing S. aureus, and cefoperazone in the non enterobacteria group.

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