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Anti-p53-directed immunotherapy of malignant disease.

Authors
Type
Published Article
Journal
Expert Reviews in Molecular Medicine
1462-3994
Publisher
Cambridge University Press
Publication Date
Volume
5
Issue
11
Pages
1–13
Identifiers
PMID: 14987396
Source
Medline
License
Unknown

Abstract

Mutation and aberrant expression of the p53 tumour suppressor protein are the most frequent molecular alterations in human malignancy. Peptides derived from the p53 protein and presented by major histocompatibility complex molecules for T-cell recognition could serve as universal tumour-associated antigens for cancer immunotherapy. Because p53 normally functions as a ubiquitously expressed self-protein, controlling cell-cycle progression and apoptosis, it also represents a paradigm target molecule for tumour-reactive yet self-antigen-specific T cells. Tailoring p53-based cancer immunotherapy thus requires both interference with p53-specific self-tolerance and induction of the entire repertoire of p53-reactive T cells. Transferring selected T-cell receptor genes into human T cells offers a novel and appealing strategy to meet these requirements.

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