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Anthropometric indicators of nutritional status, socioeconomic factors and mortality in hospitalized children in Addis Ababa.

Authors
Type
Published Article
Journal
Journal of biosocial science
Publication Date
Volume
22
Issue
3
Pages
373–379
Identifiers
PMID: 2401679
Source
Medline
Keywords
  • Africa
  • Africa South Of The Sahara
  • Age Factors
  • Anthropometry
  • Biology
  • Birth Intervals
  • Child Health
  • Child Mortality
  • Child Nutrition
  • Data Analysis
  • Delivery Of Health Care
  • Demographic Factors
  • Developing Countries
  • Diseases
  • Eastern Africa
  • Economic Factors
  • Employment Status
  • Ethiopia
  • Fertility
  • Fertility Measurements
  • Health
  • Health Facilities
  • Hospitals
  • Income
  • Malnutrition
  • Maternal Age
  • Measurement
  • Mortality
  • Nutrition
  • Nutrition Disorders
  • Occupational Status--Men
  • Parental Age
  • Population
  • Population Characteristics
  • Population Dynamics
  • Research Methodology
  • Research Report
  • Risk Factors
  • Rural Population
  • Socioeconomic Factors
  • Socioeconomic Status
  • Urban Population

Abstract

The influence of some household and maternal variables on 3 anthropometric nutritional status indices of hospitalized children in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia, are examined. On admission, only 30% of these children can be classified as being of a normal overall nutritional status. There are no significant differences in weight-for-age of hospitalized children between those residing in Addis Ababa and those residing in the rural areas. Income and father's occupation appear to be the major household factors influencing the level of 2 of the 3 indices (weight-for-age and weight-for-height). Length of last closed birth interval and, to a lesser degree, maternal age appear to have significant effects on all 3 nutritional status indices. Upon admission to hospital, children who will in the end survive their hospital stay are on average nutritionally normal or in a mild state of malnutrition, whereas children who will die during their stay arrive in a moderate or severe state of malnutrition. The degree of malnutrition is positively related to the risk of mortality in respiratory disease patients. (Author's).

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