Affordable Access

Access to the full text

Anomalous Diffuse CO2 Emission prior to the January 2002 Short-term Unrest at San Miguel Volcano, El Salvador, Central America

Authors
  • Pérez, Nemesio M.1
  • Hernández, Pedro A.1
  • Padrón, Eleazar1
  • Cartagena, Rafael2
  • Olmos, Rodolfo2
  • Barahona, Francisco2
  • Melián, Gladys1
  • Salazar, Pedro1
  • López, Dina L.3
  • 1 Instituto Tecnológico y de Energías Renovables (ITER), Environmental Research Division, S/C de Tenerife, Granadilla, 38611, Spain , Granadilla (Spain)
  • 2 Universidad de El Salvador, Instituto de Ciencias de la Tierra, El Salvador, Central America , El Salvador (United States)
  • 3 316 Clippinger Laboratories Ohio University, Department of Geological Sciences, Athens, OH, 45701, USA , Athens (United States)
Type
Published Article
Journal
pure and applied geophysics
Publisher
Birkhäuser-Verlag
Publication Date
Apr 01, 2006
Volume
163
Issue
4
Pages
883–896
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1007/s00024-006-0050-1
Source
Springer Nature
Keywords
License
Yellow

Abstract

On January 16, 2002, short-term unrest occurred at San Miguel volcano. A gas-and-steamash plume rose a few hundred meters above the summit crater. An anomalous microseismicity pattern, about 75 events between 7:30 and 10:30 hours, was also observed. Continuous monitoring of CO2 efflux on the volcano started on November 24, 2001, in the attempt to provide a multidisciplinary approach for its volcanic surveillance. The background mean of the diffuse CO2 emission is about 16 g m-2 d-1, but a 17- fold increase, up to 270 g m-2 d-1, was detected on January 7, nine days before the January 2002 short-term unrest at San Miguel volcano. These observed anomalous changes on diffuse CO2 degassing could be related to either a sharp increase of CO2 pressure within the volcanic-hydrothermal system or degassing from an uprising fresh gas-rich magma within the shallow plumbing system of the volcano since meteorological fluctuations cannot explain this observed increase of diffuse CO2 emission.

Report this publication

Statistics

Seen <100 times