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Anisotropic silk fibroin/gelatin scaffolds from unidirectional freezing.

Authors
  • Asuncion, Maria Christine Tankeh1
  • Goh, James Cho-Hong2
  • Toh, Siew-Lok3
  • 1 National University of Singapore, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Singapore. Electronic address: [email protected] , (Singapore)
  • 2 National University of Singapore, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Singapore; National University of Singapore, Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Singapore. , (Singapore)
  • 3 National University of Singapore, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Singapore; National University of Singapore, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Singapore. , (Singapore)
Type
Published Article
Journal
Materials science & engineering. C, Materials for biological applications
Publication Date
Oct 01, 2016
Volume
67
Pages
646–656
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1016/j.msec.2016.05.087
PMID: 27287164
Source
Medline
Keywords
Language
English
License
Unknown

Abstract

Recent studies have underlined the importance of matching scaffold properties to the biological milieu. Tissue, and thus scaffold, anisotropy is one such property that is important yet sometimes overlooked. Methods that have been used to achieve anisotropic scaffolds present challenges such as complicated fabrication steps, harsh processing conditions and toxic chemicals involved. In this study, unidirectional freezing was employed to fabricate anisotropic silk fibroin/gelatin scaffolds in a simple and mild manner. Morphological, mechanical, chemical and cellular compatibility properties were investigated, as well as the effect of the addition of gelatin to certain properties of the scaffold. It was shown that scaffold properties were suitable for cell proliferation and that mesenchymal stem cells were able to align themselves along the directed fibers. The fabricated scaffolds present a platform that can be used for anisotropic tissue engineering applications such as cardiac patches. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

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