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Anisakis spp. in fishery products from Japanese waters: Updated insights on host prevalence and human infection risk factors.

Authors
  • Gomes, Tiago Leandro1
  • Quiazon, Karl Marx A2
  • Kotake, Maho1
  • Itoh, Naoki1
  • Yoshinaga, Tomoyoshi3
  • 1 Department of Aquatic Bioscience, Graduate School of Agricultural and Life Sciences, The University of Tokyo, 1-1-1 Yayoi, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8657, Japan. , (Japan)
  • 2 Department of Aquatic Bioscience, Graduate School of Agricultural and Life Sciences, The University of Tokyo, 1-1-1 Yayoi, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8657, Japan; Freshwater Aquaculture Center and College of Fisheries, Central Luzon State University, Science City of Muñoz, Nueva Ecija 3120, Philippines. , (Japan)
  • 3 Department of Aquatic Bioscience, Graduate School of Agricultural and Life Sciences, The University of Tokyo, 1-1-1 Yayoi, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8657, Japan. Electronic address: [email protected] , (Japan)
Type
Published Article
Journal
Parasitology international
Publication Date
Oct 01, 2020
Volume
78
Pages
102137–102137
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1016/j.parint.2020.102137
PMID: 32439483
Source
Medline
Keywords
Language
English
License
Unknown

Abstract

The nematodes of the genus Anisakis are among the most relevant parasitic hazards in fishery products since they are responsible for human infection and allergy cases. In a food safety and epidemiological perspective, several marine hosts from different locations around Japan were examined to characterize the parasitism of Anisakis larvae. Chum salmon (Oncorhynchus keta) and Alaska pollock (Gadus chalcogrammus) showed the highest overall prevalence (100%), followed by blue mackerel (Scomber australasicus) (97.5%), Pacific cod (Gadus macrocephalus) (80%), chub mackerel (Scomber japonicus) (60.1%), Japanese flying squid (Todarodes pacificus) (17%) and Japanese pilchard (Sardinops sagax melanostictus) (2%). In Pacific krill (Euphausia pacifica), apart from one Hysterothylacium aduncum larva, no Anisakis specimens were detected. Anisakis simplex sensu stricto was molecularly identified (PCR-RFLP) for the first time in Japanese flying squid and Japanese pilchard distributed in the Northwestern Pacific ocean. That was the most frequent parasitic species detected followed by A. pegreffii, mostly in the western areas of Japan, hybrid genotypes between the two sibling species as well as A. typica and A. berlandi. Surprisingly, A. simplex s.s. was the most abundant species in one batch of chub mackerel from the East China Sea and A. pegreffii was the main species found in one batch from the Pacific coast of Aomori, which seems to indicate that the ranges of these two sibling species might be more variable than previously thought. Copyright © 2020 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

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