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Animal foods and postmenopausal breast cancer risk: a prospective cohort study.

Authors
  • Marcondes, Larissa Hansen1
  • Franco, Oscar H1
  • Ruiter, Rikje1
  • Ikram, Mohammad Arfan1
  • Mulder, Marlies1
  • Stricker, Bruno H1, 2
  • Kiefte-de Jong, Jessica C1, 3, 4
  • 1 Department of Epidemiology, Erasmus MC, PO Box 2040, 3000 CA, Rotterdam, The Netherlands. , (Netherlands)
  • 2 Department of Internal Medicine, Erasmus MC, PO Box 2040, 3000 CA, Rotterdam, The Netherlands. , (Netherlands)
  • 3 Leiden University College, PO Box 13228, 2501 EE, The Hague, The Netherlands. , (Netherlands)
  • 4 Department of Public Health and Primary Care, Leiden University Medical Center/LUMC-Campus The Hague, PO Box 9600, 2300 RC, Leiden, The Netherlands. , (Netherlands)
Type
Published Article
Journal
British Journal Of Nutrition
Publisher
Cambridge University Press
Publication Date
Sep 14, 2019
Volume
122
Issue
5
Pages
583–591
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1017/S0007114519000072
PMID: 30832747
Source
Medline
Keywords
Language
English
License
Unknown

Abstract

The role of diet on breast cancer risk is not well elucidated but animal food sources may play a role through, for example, the pathway of the insulin-like growth factor 1 system or cholesterol metabolism. The aim of this study was to evaluate the association between animal foods and the risk of postmenopausal breast cancer. This study was embedded in the Rotterdam Study, a population-based prospective cohort study of subjects aged 55 years and over (61 % female). Dietary intake of different animal foods was assessed at baseline using a validated FFQ and adjusted for energy intake using the residual method. We performed Cox proportional hazards modelling to analyse the association between the intake of the different food sources and breast cancer risk after adjustment for socio-demographic, lifestyle and metabolic factors. During a median follow-up of 17 years, we identified 199 cases of breast cancer (6·2 %) among 3209 women. After adjustment for multiple confounders, no consistent association was found between the intake of red meat intake, poultry, fish or dairy products and breast cancer risk. However, we found that egg intake was significantly associated with a higher risk of breast cancer (hazard ratioQ4 v. Q1: 1·83; 95 % CI 1·20, 2·79; Ptrend=0·01). In conclusion, this study found that dietary egg intake but no other animal foods was associated with a higher risk of postmenopausal breast cancer. Further research on the potential mechanisms underlying this association is warranted.

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