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Animal Feed Production and Contamination by Foodborne Salmonella

Authors
  • Maciorowski, K. G.1, 2
  • Herrera, P.1
  • Kundinger, M. M.1, 3
  • Ricke, S. C.1, 4
  • 1 Texas A&M University, Poultry Science Dept., College Station, TX, 77843, USA , College Station (United States)
  • 2 Delaware State University, Agriculture & Natural Resources Dept., Dover, DE, 19901, USA , Dover (United States)
  • 3 University of Wisconsin, 2000 W. 5th Street, Marshfield, WI, 54449, USA , Marshfield (United States)
  • 4 University of Arkansas, Dept. of Food Science, 2659 N. Young Avenue, Fayetteville, AR, 72704, USA , Fayetteville (United States)
Type
Published Article
Journal
Journal of Consumer Protection and Food Safety
Publisher
Springer-Verlag
Publication Date
Aug 01, 2006
Volume
1
Issue
3
Pages
197–209
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1007/s00003-006-0036-z
Source
Springer Nature
Keywords
License
Yellow

Abstract

Animal feeds can potentially become contaminated with foodborne Salmonella either during harvesting, processing at the feed mill or during storage. Any environment that comes in contact with feed during these stages that also harbors Salmonella can theoretically contaminate the feed. This also holds true for ingredients that are combined with feeds as they are being mixed at the feed mill. Animal feeds are also potential reservoirs for cross contamination from Salmonella containing vectors and environmental sources while being fed to animals. Although several factors may determine the extent of contamination, the potential for infection in animals these have not been well characterized. In addition, certain animal management and feeding programs can lead to animals becoming more susceptible to Salmonella colonization and invasion. Control measures to limit Salmonella contamination of feed include agents that directly reduce or destroy the organism in feed. Antimicrobial compounds and management strategies have also been developed for preventing colonization and eliminating Salmonella colonized in the gastrointestinal tract. The future prospects for minimizing Salmonella contaminated feed will probably involve combining more efficient monitoring and sampling approaches with more rapid and sensitive detection technologies.

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