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Angiogenic factors for prediction of preeclampsia and intrauterine growth restriction onset in high-risk women: AngioPred study.

Authors
  • Raia-Barjat, Tiphaine1, 2
  • Prieux, Carole1
  • Gris, Jean-Christophe3, 4
  • Chapelle, Céline2, 5
  • Laporte, Silvy2, 5
  • Chauleur, Céline1, 2
  • 1 a Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics , University Hospital , Saint Étienne , France. , (France)
  • 2 b INSERM UMR1059, University Jean Monnet , Saint Étienne , France. , (France)
  • 3 c Laboratory of Haematology , University Hospital , Nîmes , France. , (France)
  • 4 d Research Unit EA2992, Montpellier University , Montpellier , France. , (France)
  • 5 e Clinical Pharmacology Unit, University Hospital , Saint Étienne , France. , (France)
Type
Published Article
Journal
The Journal of Maternal-Fetal & Neonatal Medicine
Publisher
Informa UK (Taylor & Francis)
Publication Date
Jan 01, 2019
Volume
32
Issue
2
Pages
248–257
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1080/14767058.2017.1378325
PMID: 28889770
Source
Medline
Keywords
Language
English
License
Unknown

Abstract

The study aimed to compare the level of two angiogenic factors, soluble fms-like tyrosine kinase-1 (sFlt1) and soluble endoglin (sEng), for the prediction of preeclampsia and intrauterine growth restriction in high-risk pregnant women. A prospective multicenter cohort study of 200 pregnant patients was conducted between June 2008 and October 2010. sFlt1 and sEng were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Forty-five patients developed a placenta-mediated adverse pregnancy outcome. Plasma levels of sFlt1 and sEng were higher in patients who will experience a preeclampsia at 28, 32, and 36 weeks compared with patients with no complication. The same results were observed for intrauterine growth restriction. Plasma levels of sFlt1 and sEng were not significantly different for patients with preeclampsia compare to patients with intrauterine growth restriction. Patients with early pre-eclampsia (PE) had very high rates of angiogenic factors at 20, 24, and 28 weeks. Patients with late PE and early and late intrauterine growth retardation (IUGR) had high rates at 32 and 36 weeks. In high-risk women, angiogenic factors are disturbed before the onset of preeclampsia and this is true for intrauterine growth restriction.

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