Affordable Access

deepdyve-link
Publisher Website

Androgen and prolactin manipulation induces changes in aggressive and nurturing behavior in a fish with male parental care.

Authors
  • Cunha, Adriano A P1
  • Partridge, Charlyn G2
  • Knapp, Rosemary3
  • Neff, Bryan D4
  • 1 Department of Biology, University of Western Ontario, London, ON N6A 5B7, Canada. , (Canada)
  • 2 Annis Water Resources Institute, Grand Valley State University, Muskegon 49441, MI, USA.
  • 3 Department of Biology, University of Oklahoma, Norman, OK 73019, USA.
  • 4 Department of Biology, University of Western Ontario, London, ON N6A 5B7, Canada. Electronic address: [email protected] , (Canada)
Type
Published Article
Journal
Hormones and Behavior
Publisher
Elsevier
Publication Date
Nov 01, 2019
Volume
116
Pages
104582–104582
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1016/j.yhbeh.2019.104582
PMID: 31445012
Source
Medline
Keywords
Language
English
License
Unknown

Abstract

Parental care can include two general types of behavior: (1) aggressive behavior, which is used to defend offspring from predators; and (2) nurturing behavior, which is used to provide offspring with environmental conditions or resources necessary for survival. Many studies have implicated androgens in promoting aggressive behavior and prolactin in promoting nurturing behavior. We experimentally manipulated these hormones to investigate their effects on parental care behavior in bluegill (Lepomis macrochirus). Parental males, which provide sole care to the developing eggs and larvae, received an implant with an androgen (11-ketotestosterone [11-KT]), an androgen antagonist (flutamide), prolactin, a prolactin-release inhibitor (bromocriptine), or castor oil (placebo). We found that 11-KT implants led to a significant increase in the frequency of aggressive behavior directed towards a simulated brood predator, and were associated with a nearly significant decrease in the frequency of nurturing behavior directed towards the developing eggs. In contrast, prolactin implants were associated with a significant increase in the frequency of nurturing behavior, but also reduced the frequency of aggressive behavior directed towards the simulated brood predator. These results suggest a hormone-mediated mechanistic trade-off between nurturing and aggressive behavior, whereby parental males are unable to be both highly nurturing and highly aggressive. Copyright © 2019 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

Report this publication

Statistics

Seen <100 times