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An analysis of the role of microfilaments in the establishment and maintenance of asymmetry in Caenorhabditis elegans zygotes.

Authors
Type
Published Article
Journal
Developmental Biology
Publisher
Elsevier
Volume
125
Issue
1
Pages
75–84
Source
UCSC Stem Cell biomedical-ucsc
License
Unknown

Abstract

Microfilaments are needed to generate asymmetry during the first cell cycle in Caenorhabditis elegans zygotes. To investigate when and how microfilaments participate in this process, we have "pulsed" zygotes with the microfilament inhibitor cytochalasin D (CD) at different times during the cell cycle. We have shown that microfilaments are only required during a narrow time interval approximately three-quarters of the way through the first cell cycle for the manifestations of asymmetry that occur during and subsequent to this interval. When CD treatment spans this critical time interval, pseudocleavage, pronuclear migration, germ-granule segregation (all of which occur during the interval), and movement of the mitotic spindle to an asymmetric position (which occurs later in the cell cycle) are perturbed. In contrast, embryos briefly treated with CD before or after the critical time interval manifest normal asymmetry. Our results suggest that in C. elegans microfilaments participate in the generation of zygotic asymmetry by providing spatial cues and/or serving as a part of the necessary machinery only during a brief period in the first cell cycle, and are not required to maintain asymmetries that have already been established.

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