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An analysis of the personal reasons for discontinuing IUD use.

Authors
  • 1
  • 1 Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, State University of Campinas (UNICAMP), SP, Brazil. , (Brazil)
Type
Published Article
Journal
Contraception
0010-7824
Publisher
Elsevier
Publication Date
Volume
50
Issue
4
Pages
339–347
Identifiers
PMID: 7813222
Source
Medline
Keywords
License
Unknown

Abstract

The objectives were to examine the rates and timing of IUD discontinuation for personal reasons, and to analyze the users' discontinuation characteristics. Data were used from randomized clinical trials with a total of 2748 TCu 380A users, healthy and sexually active women, between 18 and 40 years of age; and comparing the performance of the TCu 380A3 with that of various other IUDs conducted by Family Health International, from 1985 to 1989, in family planning clinics located in Cameroon, Chile, Egypt, El Salvador, Malaysia, Mexico (2 centers), Nigeria, Pakistan, Peru, Philippines (3 centers), Sri Lanka (2 centers), Thailand, Turkey, and Venezuela. The last pregnancy ended at least 40 days before IUD insertion. Participants were asked to return for follow-up visits at 1, 3, 6, and 12 months after insertion. Subjects discontinuing IUD use for personal reasons were more likely to be married or in a consensual union and to have fewer years of education; to reside in rural areas; to have had fewer children and to want additional children; and less likely to have been previous IUD users than were women who discontinued IUD use for medical reasons or who were lost to follow-up or continued IUD use after the 12-month follow-up visit. At 12 months of use, the discontinuation rate for personal reasons was 4.0/100 women, compared to 5.8/100 women for medical reasons, and 3.7/100 women for pregnancy and expulsion. 31.8% of the 88 cases discontinuing for personal reasons had a planned pregnancy; and the husband's objection or family influence against IUD use contributed to 26.1% of the IUD removals for personal reasons. 18.2% no longer needed contraception and 13.6% wished to switch methods. Dissatisfaction with the method, moving to another country, and unspecified reasons together were responsible for 10.3% of the discontinuations for personal reasons. Other variables which were not statistically significant constituted: age, parity, additional children wanted, previous contraceptive method used, and months after last pregnancy.

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