Affordable Access

Analysis Of Blood Culture Results Of Burn Septicaemia Patients Over A Period Of Nine Years In The Baghdad Burn Medical Centre

Authors
  • Almajidy, A.K.
  • Jasim, A.K.
  • Almajidy, R.K.
Type
Published Article
Journal
Annals of Burns and Fire Disasters
Publisher
Euro-Mediterranean Council for Burns and Fire Disasters - MBC
Publication Date
Mar 31, 2020
Volume
33
Issue
1
Pages
27–32
Identifiers
PMID: 32523492
PMCID: PMC7263722
Source
PubMed Central
Keywords
License
Unknown
External links

Abstract

Burn is one of the most devastating traumas that someone can encounter in their life. Burn wound sepsis is still the leading cause of death in burned patients. Appropriate knowledge of the causative pathogen in burn sepsis is important for successful patient management and for the reduction of the incidence of antibiotic resistance. A retrospective study was conducted between 2010 and 2018 at the Burn Specialty Hospital in Baghdad. A total of 320 blood culture samples were obtained from patients with sepsis or suspected of having sepsis. Patient age ranged between 9 months to 70 years old, with a mean total burn surface area of 45.26%. The most common microorganisms isolated from those patients who had sepsis or suspicion of sepsis were Klebsiella (48 cases) followed by Pseudomonas (36 cases), Staphylococcus species (26 cases), Enterococcus (8 cases), Acinetobacter (11 cases), E-Coli (11 cases), Candida (4 cases), Proteus (2 cases), and Salmonella, Streptococcus pneumonia, Monilia, and Seriata one case for each. The most commonly isolated organism was Klebsiella: it was sensitive to Imipenem followed by Amikacin, Nitrofurantoin, Piperacillin, Ciprofloxacin, Co-trimoxazole, Chloramphenicol, Tetracycline, Azithromycin and Cefotaxime. Microbiological surveillance of burn patients with sepsis or suspicion of having sepsis over a period of 9 years in our hospital has shown that the most common microorganism isolated from blood cultures was Klebsiella. Klebsiella was sensitive to Imipenem mainly according to sensitivity testing using the disk diffusion method.

Report this publication

Statistics

Seen <100 times