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Amygdalin content of seeds, kernels and food products commercially-available in the UK

Authors
  • Bolarinwa, Islamiyat F.
  • Orfila, Caroline
  • Morgan, Michael R.A.1, 2, 3, 4
  • 1 School of Food Science & Nutrition
  • 2 University of Leeds
  • 3 Department of Food Science & Engineering
  • 4 Ladoke Akintola University of Technology
Type
Published Article
Journal
Food Chemistry
Publisher
Elsevier
Publication Date
Jan 01, 2013
Accepted Date
Nov 01, 2013
Volume
152
Pages
133–139
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1016/j.foodchem.2013.11.002
Source
Elsevier
Keywords
License
Unknown

Abstract

Cyanogenic glycosides are a large group of secondary metabolites that are widely distributed in the plant kingdom, including many plants that are commonly consumed by humans. The diverse chemical nature of cyanogenic glycosides means that extraction and analysis of individual compounds can be difficult. In addition, degradation can be rapid under appropriate conditions. Amygdalin is one of the cyanogenic glycosides found, for example, in apples, apricots and almonds. We have developed and applied a high performance liquid chromatographic procedure for amygdalin quantification to investigate extraction efficiency and to determine levels in a range of commercially-available foods for the first time. Our results show that seed from Rosaceae species contained relatively high amounts (range 0.1–17.5mgg−1) of amygdalin compared to seed from non-Rosaceae species (range 0.01–0.2mgg−1). The amygdalin content of processed food products was very low.

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